DOUGLAS F STRAIT
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HONORED ON PANEL 6W, LINE 8 OF THE WALL

DOUGLAS FRANK STRAIT

WALL NAME

DOUGLAS F STRAIT

PANEL / LINE

6W/8

DATE OF BIRTH

01/29/1950

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH TUY

DATE OF CASUALTY

10/18/1970

HOME OF RECORD

MOSES LAKE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Grant County

STATE

WA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP6

Book a time
Contact Details
STATUS

MIA

ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DOUGLAS FRANK STRAIT
POSTED ON 10.21.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP6 Douglas Frank Strait, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 6.24.2011

Crash Information on U.S. Army helicopter OH-6A tail number 67-16193

On October 18, 1970, WO1 William J. Cahill, pilot; SP4 Douglas Strait, observer; and SP4 Ray E. Dailey, gunner, were the crew of an OH6A helicopter (tail #67-17193). The aircraft was part of a flight of 2 helicopters on a reconnaissance mission in Binh Tuy Province, South Vietnam, about 30 miles northeast of the city of Xuan Loc. While attempting to mark an enemy target, the aircraft was hit by small arms ground fire and crashed into an area of 100-foot trees and heavy jungle. Due to the dense vegetation and the onset of darkness, the aircraft was not seen on the ground, but the post-crash fire was. Shortly after impact, the aircraft exploded violently, clearing 35 meters of undergrowth and creating a 4 foot wide by 3 foot deep crater. Attempts to contact the downed crew members by radio were unsuccessful. On October 19, a search and recovery element entered the crash site area and located the body of SP4 Dailey about 100 meters west of the crash site. Cahill's body was found east of the crash site. One M16 rifle, one M45 caliber pistol, one M79 grenade launcher and 3 flight helmets were located in the immediate crash site area. One helmet had been destroyed by fire, and one by the explosion. The third helmet was in good condition, indicating that either it or its wearer was thrown clear of the aircraft. The weapons were either in poor condition or completely destroyed. The aircraft was scattered over an area of about 50 meters. During the search, no sign of SP4 Strait was found. On October 27, a U.S. element discovered an aviator's boot print intermingled with those of an enemy force about 800-900 meters north of the crash site. Whether the footprints were made by Strait or an enemy wearing an aviator's boot is unknown. Because no remains were found for Strait, and one helmet was found in good condition, and U.S. aviator boot prints were found near the crash site, the possibility exists that Strait survived the crash to be captured. Specialist Straight was initially declared missing. In November 1975, he was declared deadbody not recovered. He was not reported alive in the Vietnamese prison system. In 1983, U.S. intelligence received information about the crash site of a U.S. aircraft and buried remains in the where area Specialist Strait was lost, but this report could not be correlated specifically to Specialist Strait. [Taken from the vhpa.org website]
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POSTED ON 6.27.2007
POSTED BY: Beth (posted 27 June 2007)

Douglas Frank Strait

I also wore a rememberance bracelet for Douglas F. Strait. I wore it through my years in junior and high school (1972-1978) in Battle Creek, Michigan. I recently found my bracelet in a drawer at my parents home and decided to do more research on Douglas. This search has led me here to remember Douglas, one of the many brave men and women who bravely served their country and paid the ultimate price.
God Bless You !!!
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POSTED ON 11.19.2005
POSTED BY: Bob Ross

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Frye – 1932

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POSTED ON 2.23.2003
POSTED BY: Candace Lokey

Not Forgotten

I have not forgotten you. I chair the Adoption Committee for The National League of Families of Prisoners of War and Missing in Action in Southeast Asia. We will always remember the 1,889 Americans still unaccounted for in Southeast Asia and the thousands of others that lost their lives. We will not stop our efforts until all of you are home where you belong.

We need to reach the next generation so that they will carry on when our generation is no longer able. To do so, we are attempting to locate photographs of all the missing. If you are reading this remembrance and have a photo and/or memory of this missing American that you would like to share for our project, please contact me at:

Candace Lokey
PO Box 206
Freeport, PA 16229
[email protected]

If you are not familiar with our organization, please visit our web site at :

www.pow-miafamilies.org
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