STEPHEN A RUSCH
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HONORED ON PANEL 2W, LINE 113 OF THE WALL

STEPHEN ARTHUR RUSCH

WALL NAME

STEPHEN A RUSCH

PANEL / LINE

2W/113

DATE OF BIRTH

07/28/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/07/1972

HOME OF RECORD

LAMBERTVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Hunterdon County

STATE

NJ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

CAPT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STEPHEN ARTHUR RUSCH
POSTED ON 7.28.2017
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Captain Stephen Arthur Rusch, Served with the 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 366th Tactical Fighter Wing, 7th Air Force.
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POSTED ON 6.9.2014

Final Mission of 1LT Stephen A. Rusch

The Phantom, used by Air Force, Marine and Navy air wings, served a multitude of functions including fighter-bomber and interceptor, photo and electronic surveillance. The two man aircraft was extremely fast (Mach 2), and had a long range (900 - 2300 miles, depending on stores and mission type). The F-4 was also extremely maneuverable and handled well at low and high altitudes. Most pilots considered it one of the "hottest" planes around. 1LT Carter A. Howell was the pilot and 1LT Stephen A. Rusch the co-pilot of an F-4E Phantom from the 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron based at Da Nang, Republic of Vietnam. On March 7, 1972, the two were sent on an operational mission over Laos. During the mission their aircraft was seen to impact the ground while making a run on a target. No parachutes were seen and no emergency beepers were heard to indicate the crew was safe. However, the opportunity existed for the two to safely eject, and they were not declared dead, but missing in action. The loss occurred about 25 miles east of the town of Ban Toumlan in Saravane Province, Laos. When American involvement in Southeast Asia ended with the signing of the Paris Peace agreements, prisoners of war, it was agreed, would be released. The country of Laos, meanwhile, not having been included in the peace talks, announced publicly that prisoners of war held in Laos would be released from Laos. The U.S. never negotiated for the release of these men. Not one American serviceman held in Laos was released, although nearly 600 went down there, and many survived their crashes and were known to have been captured. [Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.org]
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POSTED ON 6.2.2014
POSTED BY: James H. Vineburgh

Stephen Arthur Rusch

Steve and I were roommates at The Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania from 1958-59. Steve left The Hill and graduated from The Hun School.

I will always remember his laugh, his love of music and the fact that he was a rascal. I lost track of him until I learned that he was MIA. The fact that he is buried with other heroes is very comforting. If his children ever read this, I would be very happy to connect with them. I live in Bluffton, South Carolina.

When our Hill class celebrated our 50th reunion in 2011, produced a "yearbook". Steve is include among those "Gone but notForgotten". Rest well, my friend and thank you for your service and for your sacrifice.
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POSTED ON 3.7.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering an American Hero

Dear Captain Stephen Arthur Rusch, sir



As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.



May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say 'thank you'; for America, for your daughter, Major Sharon R. Bannister, and those who love you, and for the Sgt's son.



With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir



Curt Carter (son of Sgt. Ardon William Carter, 101st Airborne, February 4, 1966, South Vietnam)


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POSTED ON 6.7.2011

If I should die...remembrances for CAPT. Stephen Arthur RUSCH, USAF...who died for our country!!!!!!

If I should die, and leave you here awhile, be not like others, sore undone, who keep long vigils by the silent dust, and weep...for MY sake, turn again to life, and smile...Nerving thy heart, and trembling hand to do something to comfort other hearts than thine...Complete these dear, unfinished tasks of mine...and I, perchnace, may therein comfort you.
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