ARFIEN C ALI
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HONORED ON PANEL 5E, LINE 53 OF THE WALL

ARFIEN CLIFFORD ALI

WALL NAME

ARFIEN C ALI

PANEL / LINE

5E/53

DATE OF BIRTH

11/02/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/20/1966

HOME OF RECORD

ATLANTIC CITY

COUNTY OF RECORD

Atlantic County

STATE

NJ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ARFIEN CLIFFORD ALI
POSTED ON 4.12.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you....

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. As long as you are remembered you will never truly die.
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POSTED ON 11.3.2019
POSTED BY: Jury Washington

Thank You For your Valiant Service Soldier.

We can never truly repay the debt we owe our fallen heroes.
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POSTED ON 11.2.2019
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Specialist Four Arfien Clifford Ali Jr., Served with Company B, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 7.1.2019

Misadventure (Friendly Fire)

SP4 Arfien C. Ali was an Airborne-qualified infantryman serving with B Company, 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. On February 10, 1966, SP4 Ali was part of a platoon-sized search and destroy mission in Phu Yen Province, RVN, a 10-day sweep to deny the Viet Cong from stealing local rice harvests. In the late afternoon of the second day, the platoon had set up on small hill where the paratroopers began digging fighting holes as they established their night defensive perimeter. After darkness fell, the troopers settled into their foxholes. Around 7:30 PM, Ali left his position and moved forward of the line to relieve himself. He failed to alert others near him of his intentions, and as Ali returned to the line he was fired on by a “cherry” trooper (an inexperienced replacement) with an M16 rifle. He was critically wounded in the left thigh, right arm, and left lumbar. A medic provided Ali with first aid as they waited for a medivac. The evacuation helicopter, slow to respond, was further delayed when they were unable locate the paratroopers’ position. An attached mortar team had to fire three illumination flares before the dustoff finally touched down. Ali was taken to the Medical Company where efforts to sustain him nearly failed. He was later transferred to an evacuation hospital where he died nine days later. The remorseful shooter was disarmed and kept overnight on the hill, then removed the following day. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Raymond Capwell (June 2019)]
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POSTED ON 1.16.2018
POSTED BY: K

Airborne All the Way..Thank You Arfien

We still remember you after 50 years
God Bless You Trooper
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