WILLIAM T WALSH JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 3W, LINE 76 OF THE WALL

WILLIAM THOMAS WALSH JR

WALL NAME

WILLIAM T WALSH JR

PANEL / LINE

3W/76

DATE OF BIRTH

10/15/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LONG KHANH

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/14/1971

HOME OF RECORD

CHICAGO

COUNTY OF RECORD

Cook County

STATE

IL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CPL

THIS NAME WILL BE READ AS PART OF THE READING OF THE NAMES ON

11/10/2022 at 9:54pm

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REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILLIAM THOMAS WALSH JR
POSTED ON 6.14.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear CPL William Thomas Walsh Jr, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 1.1.2013
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

William is buried at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Worth,IL.

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POSTED ON 2.13.2012
POSTED BY: Ed Jones

After 39 Years of Remembering

I have finally been able to trace Farmer's name to this memorial. I am thankful for the opportunity to place a remembrance of him and would love to hear from others who wish to share in this memory.
As his platoon leader (known as 'LT'), it was my honor to have him in our unit. I did not know Farmer well. But I do remember that he was a hard worker, had a sense of humor and was a very reliable unit member. Of course, I remember well the exact circumstances of his death - where he was, where I was, the explosions... It was a true tragedy that should have been avoided. In those days, we were our own worst enemies. Sadly, he was the only member of my platoon to die in Vietnam.
I look back after 39 years and a lifetime of work and family and I know what Farmer missed. His death is a searing and personal reminder of what life means and the potential lost when one dies young. While Vietnam was the most defining moment of my life, Farmer remains the most indelible memory for me of that place and time.
I hope the scars of his loss have long healed for his family. My wish would be that something very good has happened to his family to balance out the pain and suffering of his death. Much time has passed and maybe the good Lord has seen fit to provide recompense.
I was lucky and returned home 5 months after his death. Just 2 years ago, my oldest and best friend from Vietnam, former Co. D Commander, Chuck Karwan, died. Time is and will continue to take its toll on all of us. While those days may seem long past, their memories are fresh and worthy of our greatest respect. God bless Farmer.
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POSTED ON 9.24.2009
POSTED BY: Charles James

Farmer was my M-60 Gunner

Farmer, you are gone but you are not forgotten. I often think about you and your lost opportunities, your family and friends’ grief and loss. I only see now how young we were then and how final death is. I am so sorry that I did not protect you.

Your Squad Leader – Sgt James

To Your Brother: Our platoon and my squad – with your brother carrying the M-60 machine gun - attacked an NVA bunker complex on 14 June 1971. We came under heavy fire – small arms, 30 caliber machine gun and mortars – while crossing a river that was in front of the enemy bunkers. Due to the intense fire, we pulled back and setup a perimeter. The Lt called in artillery and at least one round of bunker-piercing HE fell short, killing Farmer and wounding others. We airlifted the wounded and the dead out of the jungle and later napalmed the enemy position. By then however, I believe that the enemy had left their complex.

We were told that the howitzer that fired the round(s) was overdue for re-calibrated. We were also told that we should not have set up our perimeter in the in the vector between the artillery and the enemy encampment.

Our stated mission was to Seek and Destroy; our real mission was to Seek and Avoid – and bring everyone home alive. I am sorry I failed to get your brother home.
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POSTED ON 6.17.2005
POSTED BY: Bob Ross

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Frye – 1932

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