JOEL A SANDBERG
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HONORED ON PANEL 15W, LINE 74 OF THE WALL

JOEL ALEXIS SANDBERG

WALL NAME

JOEL A SANDBERG

PANEL / LINE

15W/74

DATE OF BIRTH

08/08/1945

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PHOUC TUY

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/20/1969

HOME OF RECORD

MERIDEN

COUNTY OF RECORD

New Haven County

STATE

CT

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

LTJG

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JOEL ALEXIS SANDBERG
POSTED ON 5.17.2022
POSTED BY: Doug Crofoot

NOT FORGOTTEN

As we approach Memorial Day 2022 I still think of you throughout our days at Gustavus Adolphus College, fraternity brothers and roommates. Never forgotten!
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POSTED ON 1.20.2022
POSTED BY: Roger White

A Good Man

Joel and I were classmates at Naval Aviation Officer Candidate School in Pensacola, Class 42-67. We double-dated one night toward the end of our time at OCS, and I remember him as a warm, friendly guy, fully qualified for whatever lay before him. Thank you for your service and your sacrifice, Joel. You will always be remembered.
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POSTED ON 11.19.2021
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear LTJG Joel Sandberg, Thank you for your service as an Unrestricted Line Officer - Pilot. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Thanksgiving is in a few days. Time moves quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 8.3.2021
POSTED BY: ANON

Burial Information

LTJG Joel Alexis Sandberg is buried in Walnut Grove Cemetery in Meriden, CT.

Your sacrifice is not forgotten.

Semper Fortis
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POSTED ON 2.16.2018

Final Mission of LTJG Joel A. Sandburg

On December 20, 1969, pilot LTJG Joel A. Sandburg and technical observer CPT Carl E. Long were the crew of a U.S. Navy OV-10A Bronco (#155503) from Light Attack Squadron Four (VAL-4), “Black Ponies,” on a visual reconnaissance patrol north of the Vung Tau peninsula in Phuoc Tuy Province, RVN. The aircraft was on a day artillery spotting mission, and while investigating a sampan, was lost due to enemy action. When the ground controller lost communication with the aircraft, a helicopter operating in the area reported the burning wreckage eight nautical miles from Vung Tau Army Air Field. The aircraft crashed in a swamp area which gradually enveloped the wreckage, thwarting all attempts at salvage. Recovery efforts during January 7-9, 1970, resulted in partial pilot’s remains being recovered from the aircraft. The recovery team was unable to locate the remains of CPT Long, which were estimated to be in the aft portion of the cockpit, crushed beneath the aircraft’s left wing and buried under 7-8 feet of mud. The team had no equipment available capable of recovering remains. Salvage operations were terminated at that time and no other recovery efforts were planned. In March 1970, another search team returned to the crash site but was unable to locate the wreckage. On September 8, 1992, a Joint Team visited nearby Hoi Bai village to interview local residents regarding the recovery of alleged U.S. remains. Two witnesses reported they recovered remains and an identification card from the crash site. These were turned over to province officials in February 1987. The two witnesses provided the team bone fragments and other evidence correlating to CPT Long recovered from the site. On December 1992, the Vietnamese government repatriated the remains believed to be CPT Long, and they were positively identified on May 3, 2004. They were interred at Arlington National Cemetery. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org]
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