WILLIAM R BLACK
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HONORED ON PANEL 30W, LINE 72 OF THE WALL

WILLIAM RAY BLACK

WALL NAME

WILLIAM R BLACK

PANEL / LINE

30W/72

DATE OF BIRTH

04/17/1942

CASUALTY PROVINCE

TAY NINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/08/1969

HOME OF RECORD

NEWBERN

COUNTY OF RECORD

Dyer County

STATE

TN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CAPT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILLIAM RAY BLACK
POSTED ON 4.17.2021
POSTED BY: KR

CPT WILLIAM R. BLACK, USMA 1964 - BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCE (79TH)

The “Friends of Rocky Versace” remember one of Bob Walters' USMA 1964 classmates - a brother Airborne-Ranger - Captain William Ray Black, on what would’ve been his 79th birthday - 17 April 2021.
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POSTED ON 3.7.2021
POSTED BY: John Fabris

Do Not Stand at my Grave and Weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.
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POSTED ON 5.26.2019
POSTED BY: Mike Tischer

Bill Black

I never had the chance to meet Bill Black. He was my mother’s cousin. She was from Dyer, TN. My aunt Gillie Baker knew the Black family very well as she was a cousin of the Thompson’s. I was 17 when Bill was killed. His loss had a profound effect upon me as I too received a nomination to West Point. I chose the Nuclear Power program in the Navy and served 1970-1976. Bill and I come from a long line of veterans going back to the Revolutionary War.
Bill, thank you.
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POSTED ON 4.17.2019
POSTED BY: kr

CPT William R. Black - Birthday Remembrance (77th)

The “Friends of Rocky Versace” remember one of Bob Walters' USMA 1964 classmates - a brother Airborne-Ranger - Captain William Ray Black, on what would’ve been his 77th birthday - 17 April 2019.
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POSTED ON 8.25.2018

Attack on LZ Grant – March 8, 1969

LZ Grant was an isolated outpost of the U.S. Army’s 1st Cavalry Division, acting as a tactical control point and logistical supply area for the maneuver elements of the 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry. Located one kilometer from the Cambodian border in Tay Ninh Province, RVN, it was near a trail down which the North Vietnamese Army funneled supplies and personnel to fight in South Vietnam. At half past midnight on March 8, 1969, the North Vietnamese Army struck LZ Grant, announcing the battle when a 122mm rocket with a delay fuse arched across the sky and slammed into the sandbagged command bunker. The big projectile sliced through three layers of sandbags and detonated inside. The battalion operations officer was outside the bunker checking on the readiness of the base defense when the rocket hit. He raced back and found it demolished. When he looked through the smoke and dust, he could see LTC Peter L. Gorvad dead in his chair at the map board. On the east side of the LZ beyond the second or third row of wire, five Americans from D Company, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, comprised a listening post. Situated in a large depression in the ground, 10 to 12 feet in diameter, they held their position when the onslaught began. Just before daylight, they decided to try to make it back to the LZ. They got half way back when they ran into NVA. Outnumbered, PFC Charles D. Snyder and PFC Larry E. Evans were hit with very heavy fire and killed. The other three made a mad dash to the LZ, running in a crouched position and made it. At the entrance of the LZ, enemy Bangalore torpedoes blew a hole in the gate as B-40 rockets screamed in from hidden spots, and mortar fire rained down on the landing zone. The NVA launched a human wave assault, sending masses soldiers through the ruptured gate. Another D Company member, 1LT Grant H. Henjyoji, leaped out of his bunker with a M16 rifle to confront the enemy. He was killed almost instantly. The rifle company that defended the camp fought so well that most of the Claymore mines ringing the camp were not needed and were not fired. Air strikes and Spooky gunships peppered the NVA as they charged, and the camp's defenders lowered their artillery pieces and fired point-blank into the on-rushing enemy. At least six enemy made it through two rings of concertina barbwire to die less than 30 feet from the guns of the Cavalry troopers. None made it through the final defense. At 6:15 AM, the enemy withdrew, leaving behind 157 dead and two prisoners of war. U.S. losses were 14 killed in action and 31 others wounded. The lost Americans included Gorvad, Snyder, Evans, and Henjyoji; also CPT John P. Emrath, 1LT Peter L. Tripp, CPT William R. Black, SGT Walter B. Hoxworth, CPL Vincent F. Guerrero, SP4 John R. Hornsby, SP4 Thomas J. Roach, PFC Glenn R. Stair, Akron, PFC Roy D. Wimmer, and SP4 Gordon C. Murray. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, virtualwall.org, and “GIs Hurl Back Charge by N. Viet Battalion.” Pacific Stars & Stripes, March 10, 1969; “Gentle Warrior.” The Oregonian, May 28, 2000; and information provided by Bob Jones at 12thcav.us]
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