ALOYSIUS P MCGONIGAL
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HONORED ON PANEL 39E, LINE 75 OF THE WALL

ALOYSIUS PAUL MCGONIGAL

WALL NAME

ALOYSIUS P MCGONIGAL

PANEL / LINE

39E/75

DATE OF BIRTH

11/08/1921

CASUALTY PROVINCE

THUA THIEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/17/1968

HOME OF RECORD

WASHINGTON

COUNTY OF RECORD

District Of Columbia

STATE

DC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

MAJ

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ALOYSIUS PAUL MCGONIGAL
POSTED ON 2.17.2014
POSTED BY: A Marine - Vietnam

Semper Fi

Semper Fi Father.
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POSTED ON 12.8.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear Major Aloysius Paul McGonigal, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 7.19.2012
POSTED BY: Gerard E Heegan

Remembrance

Father McGonigal was my physics teacher at Loyola HS, Touson, Maryland.

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POSTED ON 8.21.2010

If I should die...remembrances for MAJ. Aloysius Paul McGONIGAL, USA...who gave his life for us all!

If I should die, and leave you here awhile, be not like others, sore undone, who keep long vigils by the silent dust, and weep...for MY sake, turn again to life, and smile...Nerving thy heart, and trembling hand to do something to comfort other hearts than thine...Complete these dear, unfinished tasks of mine...and I, perchance, may therein comfort you.
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POSTED ON 3.13.2005
POSTED BY: Jim McIlhenney

The Philadelphia Evening Bulletin - February 20, 1968

Phila.-Born Priest Killed
With Troops at Hue Front

Hue, Vietnam-(UPI)-Leathernecks pleaded with Chaplain Aloysius P. McGonigal not to go up front.
But the Philadelphia-born Roman Catholic priest had heard his Marines were going to make a charge into the Communist-infested Citadel of Hue and he would not stay behind.
They found Father McGonigal Sunday. His body lay in the rubble of a blownout building, a bullet wound in the back of his head.

Went With Troops

Offically, Father McGonigal was a Major and a desk man. They gave him an office in the Military Assistance Command Vietnam (MACV) compound in Hue. His chair was usually dusty.
The Major with the golden crosses sewn onto his lapels strove to be with U.S. fighting men in Vietnam. The Jesuit would use any means of travel to be with his men. Often he walked. Sometimes he hitchhiked through some of South Vietnam's most insucure jungle.
"He was a real circuit rider," said Lt. Col. Bruce Petree, of El Paso, Tex.

Scorned Comfort

The MACV deputy adviser said the priest was "never concerned about his personal comfort or appearence." Father McGonigal, he said, was "rumpled but always on the go." Last week he asked Petree for permission to join in the amphibious landing on the Perfume River bank adjacent to the Citadel.
"Colonel, would you have any objections if I go out with the Marines?" he asked. Petree asked why he wanted to go. The chaplain told him he felt he could do more up front than in the compound.
"Be careful," said Petree.
The Marines tried to stop him. First Sgt. Arcadio Torres, 38, of Mt. Holly, N.J., and a Captain led Father McGonigal into a corner.
"We told him that a dead man can't help people," Torres said. "But he said his job was to be with the men."

Ordained in 1953

Father McGonigal, 46, entered the Novitiate of St. Isaac Jogues at Wernersville, Berks County, in 1940, after attending St. Joseph's High School. He was ordained June 21, 1953, at Woodstock, Md. College.
He was assistant prefect of studies at Gonzaga High School, Washington D.C., and taught at Loyola High School, Baltimore. Later, he studied physics at Georgetown University.
He first served as a chaplain in the Army from 1961 to 1963. He returned to the Army as a chaplain in 1966 and went to Vietnam that year.

He Felt Safe

He was attached to the Maryland Province of the Society of Jesus with headquarters in the Provincial House of the Jesuit Fathers in Baltimore.
A letter received at the Provincial House about a week ago reported that Father McGonigal was in Hue and that he felt "pretty safe" because the Marines had the enemy surrounded there.
Father McGonigal is survived by three brothers and four sisters. They are James A., of 4529 Teesdale st.; Edward J., of 4527 Aldine st., John, of Newburgh, N.Y.; Mrs. Maria Phalan, of 4404 Cottman av.; Sister Rose Letitia, of Our Lady of the Rosary Convent, 339 N. 63d st.; Mrs. Regina Barry, of Metuchen, N.J., and Margaret, a nun with the Daughters of the Heart of Mary, Allentown, N.J.
His brother, James, is a letter carrier working out of 9th and Market sts. His brother, Edward, is a school custodian. His sister, Maria, works for the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co.
The family home was in the 6300 block of Torresdale av., Tacony.
His father, John F., was a policeman who was attached to the Rising Sun av. and Benner sts. station when he retired in the mid-1940s. The father died in 1960. His mother, Mary, died February 22, 1929.

SEMPER FIDELIS, FATHER!
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