RONALD M GOULET
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (5)
HONORED ON PANEL 17W, LINE 9 OF THE WALL

RONALD MARCEL GOULET

WALL NAME

RONALD M GOULET

PANEL / LINE

17W/9

DATE OF BIRTH

01/13/1946

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/26/1969

HOME OF RECORD

THOMPSONVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Hartford County

STATE

CT

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CAPT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR RONALD MARCEL GOULET
POSTED ON 9.3.2018
POSTED BY: wkillian@smjuhsd.org

Final Mission of CPT Ronald M Goulet

CPT Ronald M Goulet was a Special Forces-qualified infantryman unit commander assigned to Command and Control Central (CCC), Military Assistance Command, Vietnam–Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG), 5th Special Forces Group. On September 26, 1969, CPT Goulet was the leader of a Hatchet Force mission of Montagnard (“Yards”) indigenous fighters and Americans on an operation in Cambodia. The force landed under fire during which Goulet rescued one of the Americans from a burning H-34 Kingbee helicopter which was downed during the insertion. Goulet’s men mounted an aggressive assault, forcing the attacking North Vietnamese Army (NVA) to retreat. For two days the Hatchet Force skirmished with NVA squads. Then they stumbled upon a major ammunition stockpile, capturing it after a short fight. Realizing that the enemy would mount a counterattack, Goulet hastily redeployed his men. Shortly thereafter, a rocket-propelled grenade exploded near his location, mortally wounding him. Goulet died on the medivac helicopter on the way back to Dak To. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and the book “Secret Commandos: Behind Enemy Lines with the Elite Warriors of SOG” by John L. Plaster]
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.20.2018
POSTED BY: Eugene Foy

The night nva rain hell on us

I was assign to 584 eng.co. Radio operator capt. took charge of both camps. He safe a lot of lives that day,his xo lt. peck met him later on at 71 evac. hospital, told me he was Kia sad day.
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.23.2016
POSTED BY: Judy

Remembering a true hero

Ronnie lived next door to us on Till St in Enfleld, CT.
Sadly, one year and three days after this act of heroism, he was killed in action. Truly a sad day for us who knew this bigger than life, hero.

"Soldier's Medal
Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Ronald M. Goulet (ASN: 0-5334389), United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy while participating in a night tactical parachute operation over Gatun Drop Zone, Panama Canal Zone on 23 September 1968. During the conduct of the parachute jump, as the jumpers were exiting from the door of the C-47 aircraft, the anchor cable in the aircraft broke loose from its forward terminal, resulting in the failure of one jumper's parachute to deploy. As this jumper left the aircraft, he became entangled in the broken cable and was suspended outside and beneath the aircraft. Lieutenant Goulet displaying a complete disregard for his own safety, exposed more than half of his body outside the aircraft and, by holding onto the aft door frame with his legs, reached back and under the fuselage to grasp the static line of the unemployed parachute. By the exertion of almost superhuman strength, Lieutenant Goulet pulled the suspended trooper forward toward the door and finally was able to grasp the man's extended hand. With the assistance of the other men in the aircraft, the towed jumper was gradually hauled back into the aircraft to safety. In his precarious position, Lieutenant Goulet was pulling against the dead weight of a man buffeted by a 125-knot wind, simultaneously being exposed himself to the turbulence of propeller blast and aircraft instability. Should he have fallen out of the aircraft, he faced serious injury or death. Lieutenant Goulet's actions in preventing fatal injury to the towed jumper and in eliminating a situation extremely hazardous to the aircraft were in the highest tradition of unselfish courage and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army."

General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 7 (January 20, 1969)

Action Date: September 23, 1968

Service: Army

Rank: First Lieutenant
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.4.2015
POSTED BY: Dib

Ronnie's Neighbor

Ronnie lived next door to us on Till st. I was 15 around the time Ronnie was MIA, that day I noticed the dark green car pull up to his house. Two military men went to the door. Nobody was home. I told my Dad and he went over to talk to them. I saw the look on my fathers face. Norman was away at school and his father was away. Eventually, they were able to contact his family with the sad news.
I have a memory of Ronnie probably during high school working out, lifting weights in his backyard playing football with us kids in the backyard? Ronnie was the cool guy on the block and always was good with us kids. The whole family were great people. He and his family are missed.
Ronnie, a true American Hero who risked his life to protect his men during battle.
After all these years, it's heart warming yet sad to see his picture and read his story.
read more read less
POSTED ON 11.30.2014

Clad of '64

Hey Ron,

It's Fran Bania. Thought of you many times over the years. Remember Coach Lamana in gym? I'm sure you have had many talks in heaven. Save a place for me.
read more read less