WILLIAM F ABERNETHY
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HONORED ON PANEL 23E, LINE 96 OF THE WALL

WILLIAM FORMAN ABERNETHY

WALL NAME

WILLIAM F ABERNETHY

PANEL / LINE

23E/96

DATE OF BIRTH

11/17/1938

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LONG KHANH

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/21/1967

HOME OF RECORD

WINTER HAVEN

COUNTY OF RECORD

Polk County

STATE

FL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CAPT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILLIAM FORMAN ABERNETHY
POSTED ON 3.21.2022
POSTED BY: Grateful Vietnam Vet

Bronze Star Medal Award for Valor

Captain William Forman Abernethy, in addition to the previously posted Silver Star Medal, was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Valor:
CITATION:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Executive Order 11046, 24 August 1962, takes pleasure in presenting the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" (posthumously) to Captain William Forman Abernethy, United States Army, for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Abernethy distinguished himself by valorous actions on 21 July 1967, while serving as the Commander of an armored convoy proceeding down Highway 20. As the unit proceeded on its mission, it suddenly came under intense concentration of anti-stank, automatic, and semi-automatic weapons fire from a well concealed Viet Cong force. Reacting instantly, Captain Abernethy immediately deployed his men to both sides of the road and began evasive movements in a courageous attempt to ascertain the locations of the Viet Cong positions. Skillfully directing his driver through the accurate lethal barrage of enemy fire, Captain Abernethy delivered a devastating barrage of highly accurate .50 caliber machine gun fire upon the fanatical attackers. When it became apparent that additional firepower would be necessary to repel the aggressors, Captain. Abernethy fearlessly ordered an artillery concentration extremely close to his own position in order to confuse and disperse the Viet Cong. During the ensuing action, Captain Abernethy alertly observed an Armored Cavalry Assault Vehicle that had received a direct hit and erupted in flames. Skillfully maneuvering his vehicle between the Viet Cong and the blazing vehicle in order to cover the occupants withdrawal, Captain Abernethy's vehicle became the target of a devastating volley of anti-tank and automatic weapons fire. Refusing to forfeit his position, Captain Abernethy was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy fire. Captain Abernethy's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States.
See https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/100639
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POSTED ON 11.25.2021

Final Mission of CPT William F. Abernethy

Operation Emporia (July 21-September 14, 1967) was a 9th Infantry Division operation to secure the major transportation avenues in Long Khanh Province, RVN. The mission was to deny the Viet Cong (VC) concealment along routes QL-2 and QL-20, and National Highway QL-1, which the enemy had long used as vantage points for tax collection, as well as ambush purposes. U.S. ground operations were conducted by the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment (Blackhorse) with convoy escort support provided by elements of the 720th MP Battalion. The first day of the operation began with 3rd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry conducting a road march along QL-20 to secure route clearing and Rome Plow operations for the 86th Engineers. At 9:35 AM, the 3rd Platoon of L Troop, 11th ACR was leading the squadron column accompanied by members of the 615th Military Police Company when they were ambushed near the village of Xa Binh Hoa by a VC force estimated at two battalions. The enemy fired recoilless rifle, heavy machine gun, rocket-propelled grenades, and automatic weapons. CPT William F. Abernethy, the Troop commander, was able to issue an ambush report over the squadron frequency before being fatally wounded. Troops I and K were ordered to sweep to the east and west flanks of QL-20 at the point of contact. K Troop moved down QL-20 to aid the embattled 3rd Platoon. They were met by intense automatic weapons and anti-armor fire from the west of the road just south of the ambush site. K Troop replied with unit weapons supported by air and artillery strikes. At 11:00 AM, enemy fire from the east of the road had completely ceased; by 1:30 PM, enemy resistance ended, and their remnants withdrew from the area. The 3rd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry lost fourteen men in the fighting. L Troop losses included CPT Abernethy (posthumously awarded the Silver Star medal), SP4 Lawrence M. Dawson, SP4 Richard J. Schutz, PFC Douglas W. Hill (a medic from HHC w/ L/3/11), PFC Frank D. Leal, PFC Gary A. McLennan, PFC James L. Whitfield, and PVT Thomas F. Ganion. Three artillerymen from L Troop's Artillery Forward Observer team were also killed: PFC James F. Bean, PFC John J. Campa, and PFC George Foster. K Troop losses were 1LT Ponder R. Sims, PFC Roosevelt C. Curley Jr., and PFC Billy G. Rodgers. Another forty-seven Americans were wounded, and two South Vietnamese interpreters were killed. Enemy losses were put at 196 dead. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, virtualwall.org, and 720mpreunion.org]
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POSTED ON 11.16.2021

Final Mission of CPT William F. Abernethy

Operation Emporia (July 21-September 14, 1967) was a 9th Infantry Division operation to secure the major transportation avenues in Long Khanh Province, RVN. The mission was to deny the Viet Cong (VC) concealment along routes QL-2 and QL-20, and National Highway QL-1, which the enemy had long used as vantage points for tax collection, as well as ambush purposes. U.S. ground operations were conducted by the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment (Blackhorse) with convoy escort support provided by elements of the 720th MP Battalion. The first day of the operation began with 3rd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry conducting a road march along QL-20 to secure route clearing and Rome Plow operations for the 86th Engineers. At 9:35 AM, the 3rd Platoon of L Troop, 11th ACR was leading the squadron column accompanied by members of the 615th Military Police Company when they were ambushed near the village of Xa Binh Hoa by a VC force estimated at two battalions. The enemy fired recoilless rifle, heavy machine gun, rocket-propelled grenades, and automatic weapons. CPT William F. Abernethy, the Troop commander, was able to issue an ambush report over the squadron frequency before being fatally wounded. Troops I and K were ordered to sweep to the east and west flanks of QL-20 at the point of contact. K Troop moved down QL-20 to aid the embattled 3rd Platoon. They were met by intense automatic weapons and anti-armor fire from the west of the road just south of the ambush site. K Troop replied with unit weapons supported by air and artillery strikes. At 11:00 AM, enemy fire from the east of the road had completely ceased; by 1:30 PM, enemy resistance ended, and their remnants withdrew from the area. The 3rd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry lost fourteen men in the fighting. L Troop losses included CPT Abernethy (posthumously awarded the Silver Star medal), SP4 Lawrence M. Dawson, SP4 Richard J. Schutz, PFC Douglas W. Hill, (a medic from HHC w/ L/3/11), PFC Frank D. Leal, PFC Gary A. McLennan, PFC James L. Whitfield, and PVT Thomas F. Ganion. Three artillerymen from L Troop's Artillery Forward Observer team were also killed: PFC James F. Bean, PFC John J. Campa, and PFC George Foster. K Troop losses were1LT Ponder R. Sims, PFC Roosevelt C. Curley Jr., and PFC Billy G. Rodgers. Another forty-seven Americans were wounded, and two South Vietnamese interpreters were killed. Enemy losses were put at 196 dead. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, virtualwall.org, and 720mpreunion.org]
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POSTED ON 3.26.2021
POSTED BY: John Fabris

Do Not Stand at my Grave and Weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.
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POSTED ON 5.24.2020
POSTED BY: Joseph Garcia

Remembering CPT Abernethy

Remembering CPT Abernethy on this Memorial Day. Rest in Peace and God Bless You. 3rd Platoon Leader, L Troop. Joseph Garcia
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