GERALD L CARTER
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (5)
HONORED ON PANEL 5W, LINE 64 OF THE WALL

GERALD LYNN CARTER

WALL NAME

GERALD L CARTER

PANEL / LINE

5W/64

DATE OF BIRTH

02/14/1942

CASUALTY PROVINCE

OFFSHORE, PR&MR UNK.

DATE OF CASUALTY

01/26/1971

HOME OF RECORD

WINSTON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Douglas County

STATE

OR

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

LT

STATUS

MIA

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR GERALD LYNN CARTER
POSTED ON 2.14.2020
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Lieutenant Gerald Lynn Carter, Served with Attack Squadron 164 (VA-164), Carrier Air Wing 21 (CVW-21), USS Hancock, Task Force 77 (TF-77), 7th Fleet.
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POSTED ON 11.10.2018
POSTED BY: David Rees

Best friend

Gerry was my best friend going through flight training in Pensacola. Still have many Navy friends and miss him in the group. Think of him often.
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POSTED ON 10.11.2017
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

THANKS

Dear Lt Gerald Carter,
Thank you for your service as an Unrestricted Line Officer (Pilot). You are still MIA
PLEASE COME HOME.
Tomorrow is actually Columbus Day, and we remember those of you who served. It is important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Be at peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 10.25.2016

Final Mission of LTJG Gerald L. Carter

LTJG Gerald L. Carter was a U.S. Navy pilot assigned to Attack Squadron 164 (VA-164), Carrier Air Wing 21 (CVW-21), USS Hancock. The following is a narrative of LTJG Carter’s loss on January 26, 1971 by John R. Nelson: Commanding Officer, Commander George Boaz, United States Navy, was on the angle deck Elevator Two firing up his A-4F Skyhawk. After applying external power, attaching the "huffer" hose, and completing all the necessary control surface checks, the Skipper's Skyhawk went "down" for a secure communication failure. The Ghost Rider spare was LTJG Gerald L. Carter, United States Navy Reserve. Thus, LTJG Carter taxied A-4F Skyhawk #154980 forward to the port catapult, hooked up, and went to tension. With 100% thrust, Carter saluted for the catapult shot. Half way down the cat-track, one of the bridle hooks catastrophically failed. LTJG Carter had the immediate foresight to pull his emergency jettison handle; there were six olive drab streaks on the flight deck where his MK-82 bomb load slid across the cat-track non-skid paint and over the side. The Ghost Rider Skyhawk dribbled over the side and down into the sea where the carrier ran over the sinking Skyhawk. LTJG Gerald L. Carter, United States Navy Reserve, did not survive the accident. Though this crash was technically classified an "operational accident," it still hit home to the plane captains, ordnance men, and other flight deck crew as LTJG Carter had befriended the men in the line division. Although shy and quiet, LTJG Carter exemplified many of the positive values described by the Admiral at the end of "The Bridges at Toko-Ri" when describing the character, Lieutenant Brubacker. We will not forget LTJG Gerald L. Carter, United States Navy Reserve. (Narrative by John R. Nelson (former) VA-164 AT-AN) [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and a4skyhawk.org]
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POSTED ON 2.17.2015

My great uncle

Uncle Gerry, although I never got the chance to meet you I feel as if I know you in spirit. You are my great uncle and aunt Della speaks of you often. I have heard so many wonderful things about you. I cannot thank you enough for your service and hope you are well in peace. We all love you
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