JAMES K CANIFORD
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HONORED ON PANEL 2W, LINE 121 OF THE WALL

JAMES KENNETH CANIFORD

WALL NAME

JAMES K CANIFORD

PANEL / LINE

2W/121

DATE OF BIRTH

08/26/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/29/1972

HOME OF RECORD

FREDERICK

COUNTY OF RECORD

Frederick County

STATE

MD

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

SMS

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JAMES KENNETH CANIFORD
POSTED ON 1.11.2015
POSTED BY: Louise Roberts

POW Bracelet

Dear Caniford family,
Thank you for your sacrifice for our country. I found the POW bracelet for James K Caniford and would like to give this to his family. Please contact me so I can get it to you.
Very truly yours,
Louise Roberts
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POSTED ON 12.3.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SMS James Kenneth Caniford, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 7.13.2011

Never Forgotten

Rest in peace with the warriors.
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POSTED ON 2.12.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

James is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
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POSTED ON 5.27.2010

Laos, March 29, 1972: Missing in Action (National Geographic Magazine, November 1986)

The November 1986 edition of National Geographic magazine reported on the previous February’s ten-day recovery effort of a four-engined U.S. Air Force AC-130 (call sign Spectre 13) that took place 80 miles east of the city of Savannakhet, Laos. This U.S./Lao joint crash-site search fielded a six-man team from the U.S. Army’s Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii accompanied by a medic and two explosives-disposal experts. Fifteen Lao assisted in the search; Laos also supplied cooks, radio operators, and guards, some 200 people in all. Ten days of searching yielded some 5,000 bone fragments, many no larger than a rice kernel due to the plane’s high speed impact and secondary explosions. Despite that, at the time of the article’s writing, the 60 teeth and other fragments helped provide six identifications of the Spectre 13’s 14 crew members.



In the above image, United States Army team members seek what can be found of the 14-man crew of a U.S. Air Force AC-130, brought down by a surface-to-air missile in Laos on March 29, 1972. While one member of the team holds back an aluminum fuselage section, another attaches a cable so that the pile of wreckage can be pulled apart with block and tackle.
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