THOMAS B ALLEN
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HONORED ON PANEL 30E, LINE 61 OF THE WALL

THOMAS BARRY ALLEN

WALL NAME

THOMAS B ALLEN

PANEL / LINE

30E/61

DATE OF BIRTH

04/19/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BIEN HOA

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/22/1967

HOME OF RECORD

GREENVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Washington County

STATE

MS

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR THOMAS BARRY ALLEN
POSTED ON 5.28.2021
POSTED BY: Gary Washburn

Thomas, I still remember you

I just want you to know that my family and I visited your grave site in Hollandvill
MS a few years back. It was a moment I will never forget. Love you buddy,
Gary Washburn
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POSTED ON 4.10.2021
POSTED BY: ANON

Never forgotten

As your 72nd birthday approaches, your sacrifice is not forgotten.

Forever 18.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 4.9.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

As long as you are remembered you will never truly die....
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POSTED ON 11.22.2018
POSTED BY: John Braun

In Honor

SP4 Allen, You are remembered. The crew chief on U-1A 57-6119 on that ill-fated take-off.
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POSTED ON 5.3.2018

Air Loss Over Land

On November 22, 1967, a U.S. Army DeHavilland U-1A Otter (#57-6119) fixed-wing aircraft from the 54th Aviation Company crashed and burned on takeoff from runway east at Long Binh Army Airfield in Bien Hoa Province, RVN. The accident occurred as the Otter was leaving the airstrip when it hit a cable that was strung on a crane next to the runway. The pilot lost control of the plane and crashed. Personnel nearby heard the crash and came running, but the would-be rescuers had trouble approaching the wreck as it was totally engulfed. A total of nine U.S. personnel would die as a result of this accident. SP4 Thomas B. Allen, the crew chief on the flight, died in the crash along with passengers PVT Sheldon D. Bowler, PFC Marshall F. Freng, PFC Steven P. Morse, and PVT Allyson Y. Sasaki. Two other passengers, SP4 Woodrow D. Adler, a courier for Headquarters & Headquarters Company (HHC), 222nd Aviation Battalion, and PFC David L. Tasker, died four days later from burns they suffered in the accident. Military records regarding this incident listed two persons as the pilot of the aircraft. One of them, CW2 David A. Kreitzer, is the probable pilot as he served with the 54th Aviation Company and reportedly flew U-1 Otters during his first tour of Vietnam. Kreitzer succumbed on December 2, 1967, to burn injuries he suffered in the crash. The second pilot listed, MAJ Larry G. Powell, was a rotary wing (helicopter) pilot from the 45th Medical Company. Powell reportedly died after being evacuated to the U.S. Military burn unit at the 106th General Hospital in Yokohama, Japan. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, vvmf.org, and thewall-usa.com, and information provided by Don Yaxley (May 2018)]
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