MORGAN L CAHOON
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (1)
HONORED ON PANEL 14W, LINE 124 OF THE WALL

MORGAN LANE CAHOON

WALL NAME

MORGAN L CAHOON

PANEL / LINE

14W/124

DATE OF BIRTH

12/28/1950

CASUALTY PROVINCE

THUA THIEN

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/11/1970

HOME OF RECORD

FAIRFIELD

COUNTY OF RECORD

Hyde County

STATE

NC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MORGAN LANE CAHOON
POSTED ON 1.26.2022
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir The remembrance from your high school friend Johnnie Ainsley is poignant. As long as you are remembered you will remain in our hearts forever....
read more read less
POSTED ON 2.11.2021
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Vet

Bronze Star Medal Award for Valor

Private First Class Morgan Lane Cahoon was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Valor, with Combat Distinguishing Device (V), for his exemplary gallantry in action. He was also awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Merit for his sustained meritorious service. He served as an Indirect Fine Infantryman and was assigned to E CO, 2ND BN, 502ND INFANTRY, 101ST ABN DIV.
See http://www.coffeltdatabase.org/srchname.php
read more read less
POSTED ON 12.26.2020
POSTED BY: ANON

Never forgotten

On the remembrance of your 70th birthday, your sacrifice is not forgotten.

HOOAH
read more read less
POSTED ON 9.8.2017
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Morgan Cahoon,
Thank you for your service as an Indirect Fire Infantryman. As another summer comes to an end, it is important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
read more read less
POSTED ON 6.29.2017

Final Mission of PFC Morgan L. Cahoon

Fire Support Base Rifle was located 10 miles south of Phu Bai Airfield in Thua Thien Province, RVN. It was manned by elements of the 101st Airborne Division along with the 4th Battalion, 54th ARVN Infantry Regiment. During the early morning hours of February 11, 1970, FSB Rifle was overrun by units of the North Vietnamese Army. The NVA were supported with mortars, RPG teams, and multiple sapper squads. When the attack started, the NVA fired 60mm mortar rounds into the base interior, dropping 50–60 rounds inside the perimeter. Next, they fired RPG-2 rockets at the defenders’ bunkers. As the rockets came in, at least two squads of sappers breached the perimeter, some of whom immediately headed for the tactical operations center (TOC). In a well-planned advance operation, the sappers began throwing satchel charges, and NVA ground troops opened up with AK-47 fire. A pitched battle took place inside the perimeter of the fire base as the two sides fired at each other in extremely close quarters; much of the fighting was hand-to-hand combat. By 0145 hours, gunships from the 101st arrived and began firing 2.75-inch rockets at enemy positions. At 0300 hours, the NVA broke off the attack and disappeared back into the heavily forested hills, leaving their dead behind. The devastation and carnage to the base was considerable. Most bunker lines along the perimeter, as well as the TOC, were blown to pieces. Bodies were everywhere: inside the compound, in the wire and outside of the perimeter, both American and NVA soldiers. Many of the NVA had been blown to pieces; some were also burned to cinder. Most dead Americans lay where they fell. The U.S. reaction force that arrived feared they might have been booby-trapped during the firefight, and all had unexploded ordnance still attached to their web gear. During the following day, firefights with the NVA continued as American patrols entered the woods in pursuit of the enemy. It took 14 hours to clear the American and NVA bodies and destroy most of the dud and unexploded ordnance. Over 200 satchel charges loaded with Russian TNT were disarmed and 15 unfired RPG-2 rockets and one dud RPG-7 rocket were collected by American ordinance disposal personnel. Eleven Americans were killed in the battle at FSB Rifle. They included SP4 John J. Burns Jr., PFC Morgan L. Cahoon, SGT Robert R. Davis, PFC Timothy C. Farrell, SSGT Ronald L. Haug, SGT Kenneth L. Keller, SP4 Paul H. Knecht, SP4 Vincent M. La Rocca, SP4 Raymond R. Moon, PFC Marlin T. Peterson, and PFC Harold W. Shuler. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “Fire Support Base Rifle: The Day It Was Raining Dead” by Stuart Steinberg, Soldier of Fortune magazine, August 2015]
read more read less
1 2 3