THOMAS E BROWN
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HONORED ON PANEL 7E, LINE 7 OF THE WALL

THOMAS EDWARD BROWN

WALL NAME

THOMAS E BROWN

PANEL / LINE

7E/7

DATE OF BIRTH

09/26/1941

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

04/29/1966

HOME OF RECORD

DANVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Vermilion County

STATE

IL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

LTJG

STATUS

MIA

ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR THOMAS EDWARD BROWN
POSTED ON 9.22.2021
POSTED BY: ANON

POW-MIA

Never forget.

Semper Fortis
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POSTED ON 6.28.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. May you rest in eternal peace.
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POSTED ON 2.27.2020
POSTED BY: Jim Koehn

Roommates

We were roommates at NAAS meridian in 1963 until I got married in December; last saw him as I checked into VF-124 (F-8 RAG) at Miramar around February 1965.
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POSTED ON 7.26.2017
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Thank You

Dear LT JG Thomas Brown,
Thank you for your service as an Unrestricted Line Officer (Pilot) from the U. S. S. HANCOCK. You are still MIA.
PLEASE COME HOME.
It is important for us all to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 8.9.2014

Final Mission of LTJG Thomas E. Brown

The Vought F-8 "Crusader" represented half or more of the carrier fighters in the Tonkin Gulf in the first four years of the Vietnam War. The Crusader sometimes played the role of decoy in battles against SAMs (surface to air missiles), tricking the radar controlled SAM battery to follow the F-8 and allow following fighter/bombers to reach their targets. On these type missions the F-8 carried no external armament, to attain better maneuverability and airspeed. The F8 also did much work in Vietnam in the ground attack role, and were used in the myriad attacks against strategic targets in North Vietnam (Rolling Thunder). The Crusader was also a MiG fighter, either escorting strike and reconnaissance aircraft or patrolling sectors in hope of engaging MiGs enroute to intercepting U.S. formations. The Crusader was credited with nearly 53% of all MiG kills during the war. From 1964 to 1973, 83 Crusaders were either lost or destroyed by enemy fire. Another 109 aircraft needed major rebuilding. On April 29, 1966 LTJG Thomas E. Brown launched from the aircraft carrier USS Hancock in his F8E Crusader fighter aircraft with others from his squadron on a strike mission against targets in North Vietnam. LTJG Brown's aircraft was engaged in a strafing run on a surface vessel when his aircraft was seen to collide with a karst rock jutting out of the water 300 yards past the target. No ejection was seen by the wingman. Brown and the rest of the flight were striking in the vicinity of Haiphong Harbor, near the coastal city of Pho Cat Ba in North Vietnam. LTJG Brown was classified Killed/Body Not Recovered. [Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.com]
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