ROBERT M YOUNG
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HONORED ON PANEL 11W, LINE 89 OF THE WALL

ROBERT MILTON YOUNG

WALL NAME

ROBERT M YOUNG

PANEL / LINE

11W/89

DATE OF BIRTH

01/17/1945

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/02/1970

HOME OF RECORD

NEW ALEXANDRIA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Westmoreland County

STATE

PA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CAPT

Book a time
Contact Details
ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ROBERT MILTON YOUNG
POSTED ON 4.2.2024
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you.....

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. Your Silver Star citation attests to your courage and devotion to your fellow prisoners. As long as you are remembered you will remain in our hearts forever.
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POSTED ON 3.16.2024
POSTED BY: tom ford

fordy

ive got his MIA bracelet ~ CAPT ROBERT M YOUNG USA 2 MAY 70 CAMB
i just cried , im still tearing ~ ive had it for 27 years
however shit my life gets he would probably say shut the fuck up
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POSTED ON 3.13.2023
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Cao Robert Young, Thank you for your service as a Tank Unit Commander. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Lent has begun, and so has Daylight Saving's Time. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance, and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 1.28.2021
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Veteran

Bronze Star Medal for Valor Award (2nd Award)

CITATION:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Executive Order 11046, 24 August 1962, takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Bronze Star Medal (Posthumously) to Captain (Infantry) Robert Milton Young, United States Army, for heroic actions against an enemy force of the United States of America while serving as a Prisoner of War in Cambodia from 30 May 1972 to 20 June 1972. Captain Young conducted himself in a highly commendable manner during a confrontation between the senior ranking officer of the prison camp, Lieutenant Colonel Schrump, and the prison camp officials and cadre. The senior ranking American officer had been ordered to make stakes for perimeter security of the prison camp since they would serve as deterrent to prisoners in any attempt to escape. Refusing to obey this order, the colonel was threatened and punished for many days, and, although suffering from malaria, was refused medical aid. Realizing that their punishment would not change the colonel's mind, the prison camp officials then refused to give him food and water. At hearing this, although weak and suffering from severe malnutrition, Captain Young endangered his well-being by giving the colonel his full support by refusing to eat or drink until the camp cadre gave Colonel Schrump food and water. This condition continued for several days until a final decision was made and Colonel Schrump was returned to his cell, given food and water, and normal camp life was restored. During this period, Captain Young's courage, aggressiveness, and leadership by example were in the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself and the United States of America.
See https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/114781
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POSTED ON 1.27.2021
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Veteran

Silver Star Medal Award

CITATION:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain (Infantry) Robert Milton Young, United States Army, for valor and courage while serving as a Prisoner of War in Cambodia from June through September 1972. While a prisoner of war, seriously ill with disease, and dying from lack of food and medical treatment, Captain Young exhibited tremendous courage, fortitude and perseverance in his resistance against the enemy, which ultimately led to his death. In June 1972, already sickly and suffering from malaria, he joined together with other prisoners in the prisoner of war camp in a hunger strike to back the senior ranking officer, who was at this time denied food and water for refusing to make fungi (punji) stakes. After several days of denial, when the daily routine was finally restored and all began eating, Captain Young could not now eat. Due to loss of strength because of the hunger strike, his malaria now increased with fatal complications and he could not keep anything in his stomach, If he was able to get something down, it would come up within a few minutes. His illness soon developed into dysentery, chronic stomach trouble, and finally his death. Pleading on the part of other prisoners for food and medical assistance for Captain Young brought no response. His assistance at joining other prisoners in a hunger strike, even though in his weakest condition, proved his moral and inner fiber strength. This sacrifice, which ultimately ended in his death, provided an inspiration to his fellow prisoners to carry on and survive. Captain Young's noble act of silent courage reflected great credit upon himself, his family, and the United States of America.
See https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/114781
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