RICHARD E WINGATE
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HONORED ON PANEL 2E, LINE 92 OF THE WALL

RICHARD EDWARD WINGATE

WALL NAME

RICHARD E WINGATE

PANEL / LINE

2E/92

DATE OF BIRTH

07/05/1941

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

09/21/1965

HOME OF RECORD

BELMONT

COUNTY OF RECORD

Gaston County

STATE

NC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR RICHARD EDWARD WINGATE
POSTED ON 9.21.2016
POSTED BY: Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net

Remembering An American Hero

Dear PFC Richard Edward Wingate, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 7.5.2016
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Private First Class Richard Edward Wingate, Served with Company B, 2nd Battalion, 12th Calvary Regiment, 1st Calvary Division.
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POSTED ON 10.23.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Richard is buried at Gaston Memorial Park, Gastonia, Gaston County,NC. PH
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POSTED ON 2.10.2011

Photo

Photo
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POSTED ON 7.3.2006
POSTED BY: Dan Phillips

From a Schoolmate and Fellow Soldier

In Memoriam:

When I think of you, I remember a tall, dark haired, dark eyed, handsome, graceful young boy with a quick, innocent wit, an uncommon gentleness, a ready smile, and a "Devil-May-Care," laugh tempered by such a warmth and infectuousness so as to draw in anyone within earshot, all of which made him the most popular guy in our grade - with girls and boys alike. Everyone wanted to be his friend and be befriended by him.

I remember that you could whack a softball farther than anyone in the eighth grade at North Belmont Elementary School even though we had barely embarked upon the sixth grade ourselves. I can still see you clowning in the lunch line every time a teacher's back was turned. And I vividly remember your starring performance in our eighth grade play wherein I had only a small part. You are fixed in my memory just as we both were in our "salad days," and that will never change.

As I have grown older, however, the attribute of yours that I am drawn to and respect the most is bound up in the ultimate sacrifice which you made. For you, as Abraham Lincoln stated, "gave the last full measure of devotion." My own devotion to that memory has grown over the years perhaps because the shock, the disbelief, and the hurt that I felt upon first learning of your death has moderated somewhat with the passing of the years, but that attraction, more likely, is due to my having grown old enough now to dimly see that there is an end to the road which I travel as well, and that vision has given me a whole different perspective on the matter.

All those recollections, coupled with the horrific images of my own experiences with the First Infantry Division (1968-1969) in yet another theater in which you were center-stage and in which I once more played only a supporting role, have allowed me a clearer impression of the magnitude and the magnificence of that life which you laid down - which life is certainly the finest example which I can call to mind of, "the better angels of our nature."

It is, moreover, as I look back on the past thirty seven years and take into account all of the happy as well as sad memories that you were denied, I realize two important things: how fortunate I was to escape the fate which you were dealt, and to what extent your heroism has impacted on and truly enriched my own life - far beyond my, "poor power to add or detract," with my clumsy words, in fact, beyond measure or any other form of expression, for that matter.

Furthermore, as long as I have vitality of mind, that part of yourself (unconsciously and unwittingly left behind - much as you might have walked away from your footprints on some sandy beach) which you shared with me so long ago; that part, will always live on with me. I think of you often now with an affection born of our past affinity that is nearly overwhelming at times.

For all the aforementioned reasons, Richard, I salute you as schoolmate, as superlative person, and simply as hero - which you were, are, and always shall be.

I thank you!

I am a better person for having known you.

Dan (Danny) R. Phillips
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