ROBERT J WILLIAMS
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HONORED ON PANEL 1W, LINE 24 OF THE WALL

ROBERT JOHN WILLIAMS

WALL NAME

ROBERT J WILLIAMS

PANEL / LINE

1W/24

DATE OF BIRTH

09/17/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH LONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/11/1972

HOME OF RECORD

DALEVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Dale County

STATE

AL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

MAJ

STATUS

MIA

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ROBERT JOHN WILLIAMS
POSTED ON 5.11.2020
POSTED BY: Gail Rothrock

Rest in Peace Major Williams

Major Williams was Captain Williams when I first met him at the 5th Aviation Detachment in Vung Tau, RVN. He was an Instructor Pilot flying the AH1-G Cobra gunship. Major Williams always had a smile on his face and said nothing bad about anyone, that I know of, and we became friends. I was a young 19 year old Crewchief at the time. It was a small unit of only 65 men. During February of 1972 our Detachment stood-down and we were all assigned to new units. Rest in peace my friend.
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POSTED ON 8.26.2016
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear Major Robert John Williams, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 10.9.2014

Final Mission of CAPT Robert J. Williams

On May 11, 1972, CAPT Robert J. Williams, pilot, and CAPT Rodney L. Strobridge, co-pilot, were flying an AH1G helicopter (tail #69-15009), as wingmen in a flight of three AH-1G helicopters launched to support allied forces at An Loc, in Binh Long Province, South Vietnam. While pulling off the target, the aircraft was hit by enemy ground fire. Something had hit near the tail boom, and it was severed from the fusilage. The aircraft went into a flat spin and crashed. It was believed that a SAM (surface to air missile) had hit the aircraft because of the immediate separation of the tail boom. CAPT Williams' last radio transmission was, "Oh, my God!" No further radio contact was made with Williams and Strobridge. No one saw the helicopter hit the ground. Both men were thought to have died in the crash of their aircraft. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
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POSTED ON 12.4.2010

If I should die...remembrances for MAJ. Robert John WILLIAMS, USA...who made the utlimate sacrifice!

If I should die, and leave you here awhile, be not like others, sore undone, who keep long vigils by the silent dust, and weep...for MY sake, turn again to life, and smile...Nerving thy heart, and trembling hand to do something to comfort other hearts than thine...Complete these dear, unfinished tasks of mine...and I, perchance, may therein comfort you.
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POSTED ON 3.28.2006
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson

Never Forgotten

FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you, one of the gentle heroes lost to the War in Vietnam:

Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul ... and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From your Nam-Band-Of-Brothers
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