DAVID E WEIDNER
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HONORED ON PANEL 25W, LINE 90 OF THE WALL

DAVID EDWARD WEIDNER

WALL NAME

DAVID E WEIDNER

PANEL / LINE

25W/90

DATE OF BIRTH

04/18/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

TAY NINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/12/1969

HOME OF RECORD

ST LOUIS

COUNTY OF RECORD

St. Louis City

STATE

MO

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CPL

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DAVID EDWARD WEIDNER
POSTED ON 11.26.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Cpl David Weidner, Thank you for your service as a Field Artillery Basic with the 1st Cavalry. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Thanksgiving was yesterday. Happy Thanksgiving. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 4.19.2021
POSTED BY: Philip Collins

Jenning's Pals

Dave had a 58 Chevy Impala use to buy us beer at 905 as we were 18 and 19...When I got out of service in Sept of 70 I heard he was KIA in Viet Nam...Good Guy left us all to soon !
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POSTED ON 4.19.2021
POSTED BY: Philip Collins

Jenning's Pals

Dave had a 58 Chevy Impala use to buy us beer at 905 as we were 18 and 19...When I got out of service in Sept of 70 I heard he was KIA in Viet Nam...Good Guy left us all to soon !
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POSTED ON 11.5.2019
POSTED BY: jim pickett

Dave Weidner

Thank you Mr.Killian,for this information and details on Dave's death I was in my last week of AIT at Ft.Gordon when dave died.Dave and I grew up together and I lived in the same house near his parents for at least 20 yrs. after he died,but could never ask about them about the circumstances of their son's death. A little guilt . RIP,Dave.
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POSTED ON 3.10.2019

Attack on LZ Phyllis – May 12, 1969

LZ Phyllis was located five miles west of Tonle Cham Airfield in Tay Ninh Province, RVN. A little after midnight on May 12, 1969, Phyllis began to receive heavy mortar fire from enemy positions northwest of the base. The North Vietnamese Army positions were estimated to be about 600 meters out, and the barrage was approximated at 300 rounds. This was followed by small arms and automatic weapons fire. Enemy movement was detected in the wood line adjacent to Phyllis from which recoilless rifle and B-40 rocket rounds were fired. U.S. Air Force “Spooky” AC-47 gunship fire and flares were requested by Phyllis and were placed on the eastern wood line. Two Americans were killed during the assault on the LZ and 24 were wounded, 20 of which required medical evacuation. The next morning, thirteen NVA dead were found along with miscellaneous ammunition, grenades, and demolitions around the Phyllis. The enemy ordinance was policed up, placed in a trailer, and brought into the LZ. One of the rounds somehow went off, detonating the entire pile, killing nine Americans. The tragedy occurred despite a long-standing policy of blowing all explosives in place, preferable by an EOD team, and not gathering or tampering with unexpended ammo found in the field. The eleven Americans killed during the attack and ammo explosion at Phyllis included: SP4 David M. Beck, CPL Richard J. Bennett, PFC Paul D. Elwart, PFC Michael D. Fields, PFC James S. Jordan, CPL Robert G. Krell, CPL John A. Martin III, PFC Jorge L. Mendez-Matos, CPL Roland M. Settimi, CPL John F. Thompson, and CPL David E. Weidner. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “Lessons Learned, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), period ending July 31, 1969;” and the book “It Took Heroes: A Cavalry Chaplain's Memoir of Vietnam” by Claude Newby]
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