DANIEL S WALKO
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HONORED ON PANEL 8W, LINE 96 OF THE WALL

DANIEL STEVEN WALKO

WALL NAME

DANIEL S WALKO

PANEL / LINE

8W/96

DATE OF BIRTH

06/11/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TIN

DATE OF CASUALTY

08/08/1970

HOME OF RECORD

WILKES-BARRE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Luzerne County

STATE

PA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CPL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DANIEL STEVEN WALKO
POSTED ON 12.9.2018
POSTED BY: wkillian@smjuhsd.org

Final Mission of PFC Daniel S. Walko

In early August 1970, C Company, 1st Battalion, 46th Infantry, 196th Brigade, 23rd Infantry Division (Americal), was on a company-sized search and clear operation in 1st Battalion’s area of tactical responsibility in Quang Tin Province, RVN. The understrength company marched off LZ Mary Ann on July 30th, a remote firebase near the Laotian border. These missions many times lasted up to month wherein C Company would patrol 8-10 hours a day and receive occasional resupply by helicopter. The area they patrolled was rough country, mostly triple-canopy jungle where the sky was obscured and the dense foliage made it that the troopers couldn’t see more than 30 feet in front them. At 11:50 AM on August 5, 1970, the company was patrolling near the hamlet of Thon Ba (6), 26 miles southwest of Tam Ky, when it received heavy AK-47 fire. The point element was checking out a hooch when “bullets began flying everywhere.” SP4 Manuel L. Dick was hit three times in the chest and died. Two others were wounded, including PFC Daryl D. Shonka. The engagement ended when the enemy, North Vietnamese Army regulars, broke contact and fled. Inspecting the hooch afterwards, the Americans found it was filled with rifle cases. Apparently, the NVA had been trail watchers guarding the weapons. SP4 Dick and the two wounded were put in makeshift litters and carried to a clearing where a medivac was to pick them up. A jungle penetrator was dropped, and the two wounded were sent up first. The air ambulance became spooked and radioed the troopers on the ground they were breaking station, fearful that their hovering was attracting too much enemy attention. The body of Dick remained with C Company, and they continued their patrol. The formation line stretched nearly 80-men long, and as they moved though the triple-canopy jungle, an NVA sniper singled out the Company Commander’s RTO (radioman), SP4 Gary G. Winter. The sniper’s bullet entered Winter’s armpit and passed through his chest, killing him instantly. This instance and a report that PFC Shonka had died on the medivac unnerved the Company. Now carrying two of their fallen comrades, the Company climbed a nearby ridge where it and dug in for two nights, and set up a defensive position protected by trip flares and claymore mines. While on the ridge they were resupplied by helicopter, and the bodies of Dick and Winter were taken away. On August 8th, C Company moved out again. Comprised of four platoons, each platoon took turns as the point element. On this day, an inexperienced lieutenant on point led his platoon into an ambush. Ten to twelve troopers were wounded, some of which were KIA. All the medics rushed to the front of the column where the platoon was pinned down by enemy fire. Reportedly, an enemy sniper was in the trees firing down at the Americans who had dropped to the ground and were preoccupied by the firing to their front. While assisting the wounded, two medics were fatally wounded by the sniper. They were SP4 Charles D. McGonigle and PFC Daniel S. Walko. When the engagement ended, five C Company troopers were dead and nearly a dozen wounded. The enemy disappeared, and a search of their position yielded a single discarded ammo belt. The other lost Americans in the ambush were 1LT Thomas G. Edgren, PFC Calvin W. Ramsey, and PFC Wayne E. Walsh Jr. A medivac was once again requested, and the killed and wounded were removed from the field. The beleaguered C Company continued their mission. Exhausted and fraught with foreboding, the long-suffering company ended their patrol when they arrived on foot three weeks later at LZ Judy. After just a few days of rest and rearming, they were back out in the field on another mission. Shonka, Walko, Ramsey, and Walsh were all posthumously promoted to Corporal. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Jimmy Morrison (November 2018)]
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POSTED ON 4.1.2017
POSTED BY: Rick Powell

Never Forget

Four classmates of Coughlin High 1967 , who included Dan and I, joined the Army and were sent to basic together. We all were sent to Nam but at different times because of our different AITs. I was sad to find out that Dan was killed one day after I arrived in-country. I will never forget him.
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POSTED ON 3.9.2014
POSTED BY: Jerry Richmond

We Remember

Daniel was a Medical Corpsman with HHC, 1st BN, 46th Infantry, 198th Infantry BDE, Americal DIV when his unit came under hostile enemy action. Dan was killed in action on the South Bank of the Tranh River, 2 KM S SW of Thon Ba, Quang Tin Province, Vietnam. He was killed alongside 4 of his fellow servicemen during this incident. RIP Dan, your bravery, courage and dedication to your country will never be forgotten
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POSTED ON 2.3.2014

Finally found your resting place.

Since finding your final resting place it saddens me to know that many friends have forgotten their classmate who sacrificed all for their freedom. I will never forget my friend from high school who gave his life trying to save a brother in that God for saken land of Vietnam. I visit when I can and will continue to do so. Love you. Till we meet again.
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POSTED ON 11.14.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter ccarter02@earthlink.net

Remembering An American Hero

Dear CPL Daniel Steven Walko, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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