ROBERT D WADDELL
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HONORED ON PANEL 30E, LINE 74 OF THE WALL

ROBERT DOUGLAS WADDELL

WALL NAME

ROBERT D WADDELL

PANEL / LINE

30E/74

DATE OF BIRTH

02/11/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TIN

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/23/1967

HOME OF RECORD

BATAVIA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Clermont County

STATE

OH

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ROBERT DOUGLAS WADDELL
POSTED ON 3.26.2024
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you.....

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. We should be forever thankful for the sacrifices of you and so many others to ensure the freedoms we so often take for granted.
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POSTED ON 10.10.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Robert Waddell, Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Today we celebrate Columbus Day. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 8.23.2022

The Battle for Hill 63 - November 23, 1967

On November 22, 1967, U.S. forces intercepted a radio transmission sent by the North Vietnamese Army’s (NVA) 3rd Regiment. Triangulation of the signal placed its origin at Hill 63, a small granite outcrop east of LZ Ross in Quang Tin Province, RVN. The information was passed on to the 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, where Companies B and D were patrolling near Ross with two platoons of armored personnel carriers from Troop F, 17th Cavalry, and a platoon of tanks from Troop A, 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry. The following morning, this task force split into two groups and approached Hill 63 from opposite sides. When the Americans began climbing its slopes around 7:00 AM, they met a torrent of small arms and machine gun fire from concealed positions higher on the hill. Four U.S. soldiers were killed and eleven were wounded. As the infantrymen slugged their way up the northern and southern slopes, a group of M48 tanks and M113 armored personnel carriers moved around the hill to establish a blocking position on its western side. A platoon of NVA soldiers appeared near the base of the hill, fired at the Americans, then sprinted to hamlet some 220 yards away. Moments later, recoilless rifles concealed in the hamlet opened fire on the troopers. The NVA rounds slammed into two armored personnel carriers. The armored vehicles responded with machine guns and cannon fire. Taking the hill was slow and costly work, with the companies sustaining some fifty casualties in the first two hours of combat. More troops were landed near the eastern side of Hill 63 to assist in the fighting. With the NVA trapped on Hill 63, 4/21st Infantry was ordered to seize the hamlet. Supported by several M48 tanks, Company B entered a maze of hedgerows enclosing the settlement. The infantrymen silenced several recoilless rifles, allowing the tanks to destroy the NVA bunkers. On Hill 63, Companies B and D, 4/31st Infantry, reached the summit, killing the last defender around noon. The battle for Hill 63 cost seven U.S. lives and eighty-four wounded. The lost personnel included PFC Kenneth S. Adams, PFC Philip F. Adams, PFC Rodney E. Loatman, PFC Robert D. Waddell, SP4 Calvin M. Strong, SP4 Ronald H. Essler, and SGT Joseph Cloud Jr. K. Adams, P. Adams, and Loatman were posthumously promoted to Corporal. Communist losses were 128. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and wikipedia.org]
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POSTED ON 1.31.2022
POSTED BY: ANON

76

Never forgotten.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 2.6.2021
POSTED BY: ANON

Never forgotten

On the remembrance of your 75th birthday, your sacrifice is not forgotten.

HOOAH
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