JOE N TUCKER
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HONORED ON PANEL 13W, LINE 83 OF THE WALL

JOE NATHAN TUCKER

WALL NAME

JOE N TUCKER

PANEL / LINE

13W/83

DATE OF BIRTH

02/12/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NIHN THUAN

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/04/1970

HOME OF RECORD

MT CARMEL

COUNTY OF RECORD

McCormick County

STATE

SC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

SGT

THIS NAME WILL BE READ AS PART OF THE READING OF THE NAMES ON

11/10/2022 at 2:28pm

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REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JOE NATHAN TUCKER
POSTED ON 8.26.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sgt Joe Tucker, Thank you for your service with the 554th Combat Engineer Squadron. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is Agent Orange Awareness Month. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it still needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 8.3.2022

Attack on Phan Rang Air Base – March 4, 1970

In the early years of the Vietnam War, the U.S. Air Force lacked the engineering capability to quickly respond to wartime construction and disaster recovery efforts on U.S. bases. Demands were beyond the scope of a regular civil engineering unit, and the Air Force needed a squadron that could construct overseas airfields and build facilities in the most challenging conditions while supporting forward deployed tactical units. In September 1965, the Air Force created two units with the name REDHORSE, an acronym meaning “Rapid Engineering Deployable Heavy Operations Repair Squadron Engineer.” These two units would be sent to Southwest Asia. One was the 554th Civil Engineering Squadron (CES). The 554th CES deployed to Phan Rang Air Base, RVN, in February 1966, where its first major project was a complete runway reconstruction. The 554th CES would expand its capabilities beyond this mission limitation and soon found itself in all facets of air base facilities construction and development. On March 4, 1970, a REDHORSE team was constructing a revetment around the 35th Combat Support Group’s Data Processing building at Phan Rang. At approximately 2:00 PM, a single 107mm rocket was launched against the base. The projectile came at the worksite, over one revetment wall and impacted the other. The blast sent metal fragments in all directions, fatally wounding one of the workers and injuring four others. SGT Joe N. Tucker died instantly after being hit. One of the wounded required evacuation, and the others sustained minor injuries, returning to duty the following day. Tucker’s remains were transferred to Cam Ranh Air Base for return to the United States. Material damage by the rocket was significant. One wall of the computer building and equipment inside were destroyed, and the facility was put out of action for a week. Three weeks after his death, a memorial service was held for Tucker where a bronze plaque on a wooden base was placed on the rebuilt building in his memory. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and information provided by Jeffery F. Erskine (July 2022)]
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POSTED ON 2.11.2021
POSTED BY: Donna Moore

Happy Heavenly Birthday

You will forever remain in our hearts and prayers
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POSTED ON 7.25.2018
POSTED BY: Jerry Helton

I was there when Joe Tucker died.

Was waiting for the bus when a rocket came over our heads and we hit the ditch. The explosion was close and virtually hit inside a revetment going around a building and someone yelled "a guy was working in there". That is when we found Joe. He never knew what hit him which is a blessing.
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POSTED ON 2.22.2014
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SGT Joe Nathan Tucker, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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