WILLIAM A TODD
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (3)
HONORED ON PANEL 2W, LINE 124 OF THE WALL

WILLIAM ANTHONY TODD

WALL NAME

WILLIAM A TODD

PANEL / LINE

2W/124

DATE OF BIRTH

01/08/1950

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/29/1972

HOME OF RECORD

MAHOPAC

COUNTY OF RECORD

Putnam County

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

MSGT

ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILLIAM ANTHONY TODD
POSTED ON 5.27.2018
POSTED BY: Kelly, His Niece

My Uncle, My Hero

I just found this site online. Reading all the comments were amazing and sad. Uncle Billy, I love and miss you. Even though I was little when you left I still think of you and all your brothers. If anyone has any other pictures to share with me, please email them to me. You are my hero and now Daddy is finally with you again. I love and miss you both.
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.25.2018

Thank you!!

I appreciate you. Thank you for your service!!
read more read less
POSTED ON 1.5.2018
POSTED BY: Wayne L. Beck

Remembering NKP

Bill and I worked together at Nakhon Phanom Thailand in May,June and July of 1970. We were assigned to the gun shop for the A-1. We were there to TDY from Takhli for 60 days. When we left you gave me your tool pouch with "TODD NEW YORK" written on it. I still have that pouch and a kind lady from New York gave me the POW?MIA bracelet. Bill was shot down on the same day that I was discharged from the Air Force. I think of you often Bill and some day I will see you again. RIP my brother
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.30.2016
POSTED BY: Judy Brady Witherspoon

long time classmate

Billy was a member of the Class of 1968 Mahopac High School, in Mahopac, NY. Billy was in all of my elementary school classes and several of my high school classes. He was a good looking boy with a wonderful sense of humor. Glenn (in a post below) mentions the watermelon but he doesn't tell you that it was greased! I remember watching as Billy was determined and wildly chased it around the water. He was the only one to grab hold of it and hang on to it!
At our class reunions, Billy is always remembered for his service and as one of our classmates gone too soon. Many of us have stopped to pay our respects at The Wall.
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.11.2016
POSTED BY: wkillian@smjuhsd.org

Final Mission of A1C William A. Todd

Final Mission of A1C William A. Todd
On the night of March 29, 1972, an AC-130A Hercules "Spectre" gunship (#55-0044, nicknamed "Prometheus") departed Ubon Airfield, Thailand on a night reconnaissance mission over supply routes used by North Vietnamese forces in Laos. The crew of the aircraft consisted of pilots MAJ Irving B. Ramsower II and 1LT Charles J. Wanzel III, the navigator, MAJ Henry P. Brauner, and crew members MAJ Howard D. Stephenson, CAPT Curtis D. Miller, CAPT Barclay B. Young, CAPT Richard Castillo, CAPT Richard C. Halpin, SSGT Merlyn L. Paulson, SSGT Edwin J. Pearce, SSGT Edward D. Smith Jr., SSGT James K. Caniford; and Airmen First Class (A1C) William A. Todd and (A1C) Robert E. Simmons. As the aircraft was in the jungle foothills 56 miles east of Savannakhet in southern Laos, it was shot down by at least one, possibly two Russian surface to air missiles (SAM). According to the F-4 Phantom II pilots escorting the ship, the AC-130 was in a valley a few miles west of Tchepone, Laos. The gunship was working over targets in the area. Visibility was about four miles with scattered clouds at 6,000 feet. The aircraft was illuminated by the full moon to the west, a gunners' moon. Triple-A (anti-aircraft fire) was moderate, nothing unusual, until the fighter pilots saw a SAM launch from their port side. It rose up in an arc headed for the AC-130. As the gunship rolled right to avoid the first SAM, two more were fired at it from different locations. There was no way out as they were bracketed. The escort pilots agreed, he took a hit on the right wing inboard engine and an explosion and fire resulted. As the gunship started to drop down, another explosion occurred and something large and flaming was seen to separate from the aircraft. "There was no mayday call," said the Phantom pilot. "We heard a couple beepers very distinctly, but all we could see down there in the darkness were fires on the ground." This word that a number of beepers were heard caused speculation that the North Vietnamese were trying to lure rescue crews into an ambush. U.S. government sources stated in February 1986 that a fighter escort plane reported that the aircraft crashed in a fireball, no parachutes were seen, nor was radio contact made with the AC-130 or any of its crew. In 1972, however, the Pearce family was told that an F-4 support plane traveling with the AC-130 heard "so many beepers they couldn't count them" and that the emergency beeper type carried by the crew could only be activated manually. The Pearce family took this as strong proof that a number of the crew survived. The support aircraft plane left the area to refuel. When it returned, there were no signs of life. The U.S. and Laos excavated this aircraft's crash site in February 1986. The teams recovered a limited number of human bone fragments, personal effects and large pieces of plane wreckage. It was later announced by the U.S. Government that the remains of Castillo, Halpin, Ramsower, Simmons, Todd, Paulson, Pearce, Wanzel and Smith had been positively identified from these bone fragments. They were interred in Arlington National Cemetery on June 18, 2010. [Taken from pownetwork.org and us-mil-thai.tripod.com]
read more read less
1 2 3 4