STEVEN H BOYER
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HONORED ON PANEL 3E, LINE 125 OF THE WALL

STEVEN HESS BOYER

WALL NAME

STEVEN H BOYER

PANEL / LINE

3E/125

DATE OF BIRTH

11/01/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/05/1965

HOME OF RECORD

LANCASTER

COUNTY OF RECORD

Lancaster County

STATE

PA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STEVEN HESS BOYER
POSTED ON 10.17.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Steven is buried at Conestoga Memorial Park, Lancaster TWP, Lancaster County,PA.
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POSTED ON 11.27.2010
POSTED BY: Jim McIlhenney

PFC Steven H. Boyer, USA

STEVEN HESS BOYER
Army
11-1-43 - 12-5-65

'Steve' was born in Lancaster and attended McCaskey High School. He played the drums and enjoyed instrumental music.
He went to Vietnam in September, 1965 as a Pfc. and was attached to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 1st Div., 2nd Infantry.
Steve died on December 5, 1965, from wounds of the chest and arm sustained during combat.
He was survived by his parents, a brother, Grandmother Hess and Mary Boyer.
Steve was 22 years old and is remembered on Panel 3E Row 125.

From a Remembrance Book, 'WE REMEMBER,' published in 1994.
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POSTED ON 1.31.2008
POSTED BY: Jim McIlhenney

The Philadelphia Inquirer - December 8, 1965

Lancaster Man

'Proud' GI Dies in 'Dirty Job'

LANCASTER, Pa., Dec. 7 - Pfc. Steven H. Boyer last wrote to his parents that he was "proud of knowing that I am doing a job for my country."
The next Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Boyer, of 60 Pilgrim dr., Lancaster, heard of their son was the notification that he had been killed in action against the Vietcong.
Word came Tuesday that the 22-year-old infantryman had died Sunday of wounds suffered in Vietnam.
His last letter home read:
"This war has been going on for the past 20 years, and somebody has to put a stop to it.
"A lot of people back home think it's fun being over here. Well, it isn't. It's a dirty job, but I am proud of knowing that I am doing a job for my county."
He had been in Vietnam only two months before suffering the arm and chest wounds that proved fatal. He also had something to say about the protests in the United States against the Government's policy in Vietnam.
"If some people could only see what's happening here, they would think twice of burning their draft cards and protesting about us being over here."
Americans who burn their draft cards, he said, "are lower than...the bottom of the ocean."
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POSTED ON 7.29.2004

quaker hills family

steve was our paperboy and when we heard of his passing made us all very sad. I grew up with his brother doug and i know that he loved him as well as his folks as we all grow older just want all to know that steve will always be remembered. bill caldwell and family
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POSTED ON 8.26.2003
POSTED BY: Jim McIlhenney

Wounds fatal to city soldier in Viet combat

Wounds fatal to city soldier in Viet combat

The South Viet Nam war claimed the life of a Lancaster soldier Sunday less than three months affter he re-enlisted in the Army for a six year tour of duty.
Killed in action was Pfc. Steven Hess Boyer, twenty-two, son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Boyer, 60 Pilgrim Drive. He had re-enlisted in September.
Pfc. Boyer was the second Lancaster Countian to die in Viet Nam. Marine Cpl. Frederick J. Schwanger was drowned in June when his tank sank in a river near Da Nang.
According to a telegram received by his parents Monday night. Boyer suffered fatal wounds of the chest and arm on December 5 as his patrol encountered fire from the enemy.
His parents said their son had been in Viet Nam about a month, previously being stationed in Korea. He celebrated his birthday on November 1.
Steve wrote ten letters home since he had been fighting in Viet Nam and in each of them he indicated the U.S. was "doing the right thing there," his father said.
Mr. Boyer said his son's morale "was real good. He knew he had a job to do there and he was doing it."
Their son, who had last been home in August before shipping out for the South Pacific, wrote his family recently asking for a "Bowie knife."
Steve wrote: "Please send me the knife if nothing else it sure comes in handy over here."
Mr. Boyer said he immediately sent the knife to his son. "He didn't say what he wanted it for but it's not hard to figure out," his father said.
The Boyer family's last letter from Steve mentioned he was going on a seven-day patrol mission. In it he urged them not to be alarmed if they didn't get a letter from him. He wouldn't have too much time to write, he said.
The letter started out: "This might be the last letter you will get from me for awile. We are going out for seven days. There is nothing to worry about except there won't be too much time to write. I'm OK and in good shape. The days are really going fast. Guess in no time I will be back in the States."
In another letter, Steve described some of the missions he had been a part of, noting the Viet Cong rice and ammunition caches he and his companions discovered and destroyed.
Steve wrote: "If we don't keep a foothold in Viet Nam this big world of ours will get worse than it is now."
He perhaps echoed the feelings of many fighting men in Viet Nam when he wrote:
"A lot of people think it's fun being over here, well it isn't. It's a dirty job but I am proud to be with the unit and knowing I'm over here doing a job for my country."
Steve was with the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry, 1st Division, a unit beseiged over the weekend by concentrated Viet Cong attacks.
Boyer attended McCaskey High School and was employed by Bayuk Cigars Inc. and the L.B.Herr & Son stationary concern before he entered the Army in August, 1963.
Besides his parents, he is survived by a brother, Douglas William, at home; his paternal grandmother, Mrs. Mary Boyer, at home; and his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Phares Hess, Camp Hill.

Photo and article appeared in the Daily Intelligencer Journal, Lancaster, PA, on December 7, 1965.
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