GREG P STIGER
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HONORED ON PANEL 39W, LINE 63 OF THE WALL

GREG PATTERSON STIGER

WALL NAME

GREG P STIGER

PANEL / LINE

39W/63

DATE OF BIRTH

04/12/1949

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PLEIKU

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/13/1968

HOME OF RECORD

WAVERLY

COUNTY OF RECORD

Tioga County

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR GREG PATTERSON STIGER
POSTED ON 5.27.2024
POSTED BY: Carl stiger

Honoring You and your Brother

Remembering your sacrifice for our freedom with great sorrow for your family!
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POSTED ON 1.14.2024
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you.....

War drew us from our homeland
In the sunlit springtime of our youth.
Those who did not come back alive remain
in perpetual springtime -- forever young --
And a part of them is with us always.
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POSTED ON 5.18.2022
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Greg Stiger, Thank you for your service as a Field Artillery Basic. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. The 47th anniversary of the last battle of the war just passed. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 9.12.2019

Attack on FSB Vera – November 13, 1968

FSB Vera was a 4th Infantry Division fire support base located four miles south of Duc Co in Pleiku Province, RVN. It was constructed in October 1968 by the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry. Occupants of the base were the 35th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion, 8th Infantry, 1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry, and 2nd Battalion, 9th Artillery and 1st Battalion, 92nd Artillery. At approximately 1:00 AM on November 13, 1968, Vera received about forty rounds of 60mm mortar fire followed by a ground attack by an unknown-size enemy force. The enemy employed small arms and grenades as three of their soldiers penetrated the perimeter but were immediately killed. Artillery and U.S. Air Force AC-47 gunships supported the Infantry until 2:35 AM when the enemy withdrew. A sweep of the area was conducted, and an additional enemy body was found. U.S. losses were five killed and nineteen wounded. The lost Americans were SP4 James C. Hathorne Jr., SP4 Donald L. Keeter, PFC Thomas A. Norris, SFC Dale F. Rollins, and PFC Greg P. Stiger. Damage to the fire support base was light. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, campsabrekorea.com, and Headquarters, U. S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, Monthly Summary, November 1968]
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POSTED ON 10.10.2017
POSTED BY: CLAY MARSTON

IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS FINE YOUNG UNITED STATES ARMY SOLDIER WHOSE NAME SHALL LIVE FOREVER MORE


IN REMEMBRANCE OF THIS FINE YOUNG
UNITED STATES ARMY SOLDIER
WHOSE NAME SHALL LIVE FOREVER MORE


PRIVATE FIRST CLASS

GREG PATTERSON STIGER


served proudly with


B BATTERY

1st BATTALION

92nd FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT

" BRAVE CANNONS "

52nd ARTILLERY GROUP

" SEMPER PARATUS / ALWAYS PREPARED "

1st FIELD FORCE


and was a
posthumous recipient
of the following
military decorations
and service medals


BRONZE STAR MEDAL

PURPLE HEART

NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL

VIETNAM SERVICE MEDAL

REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM CAMPAIGN SERVICE MEDAL




HE RESTS IN HONORED GLORY IN

TIOGA POINT CEMETERY

ATHENS, PENNSYLVANIA




YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE




R E M E M B R A N C E



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IN MEMORY OF ...



EDWARD STIGER was born on 2 May 1948, less than a year apart from his younger brother, GREG STIGER, who was born on 12 April 1949.

The two brothers were very close growing up and both enlisted in the military after graduating from high school.

Greg went into the U.S. Army and Edward enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps.

Both were later given orders and sent to Vietnam.

From Waverly, New York, the Stiger brothers were raised by their father, a WWII U.S. Army veteran, as their mother died when they were very young.

Both excelled in sports and school, and were very popular in their small town.

Greg served as a Private First Class in the U.S. Army and began his tour in Vietnam on 17 October 1968. Sadly, he would never make it home.

Greg was killed a little over a month later on 13 November 1968 by hostile fire in the Pleiku Province of South Vietnam. He was 19 years old.

Today, his name is inscribed on Panel 39W, Line 63 of The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C.

Edward Stiger would complete a tour of a duty without his younger brother.

Before he was honorably discharged in September of 1970, he served as a Lance Corporal in the U.S. Marines Corps, where he saw a lot of combat and was wounded as a result.

Upon his return from Vietnam, Edward struggled with life back home and with the relationships he formed. He was married but got divorced a short time after.

Edward later moved from his hometown to Colorado.

One can assume it “ was an effort to get away from things that reminded him of his brother ” and to try to start a new life.

Sadly, Edward took his own life on 19 December 1973.

Everyone who knew Edward said that the Vietnam War killed him just as it killed his brother, Greg. Both Edward and Greg had daughters that they never knew.

Greg’s daughter, Kelly left a remembrance on his Wall of Faces memorial page.

It reads in part, “ I have been told that I am very much like you in many ways. If I had one wish it would be just to hold you and say I love you. I could not be more honored to have had a father like you.”

Edward, who suffered after he returned home, is remembered through the In Memory program.

In Memory is a program started by the VVMF and honors those veterans whose lives were cut short as a result of their service but are not eligible for inscription on The Wall as a result of Department of Defense (DoD) guidelines.

An In Memory plaque sits on the three-acre site of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. in their memory.

Edward was recognized through the program in 2013 and is memorialized through the In Memoray Honor Roll.

Whether killed in action or taken from us at home, the service and heroism of our Vietnam veterans will never be forgotten.

Through The Wall and the In Memory program, two brothers are together again. Both of them have a connection to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the special place set aside to honor our Vietnam veterans in our nation’s capital.

http://www.vvmf.org/Honor-Roll/2260/EdwardEarlStiger



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