RONALD E SMITH
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HONORED ON PANEL 6W, LINE 89 OF THE WALL

RONALD EUGENE SMITH

WALL NAME

RONALD E SMITH

PANEL / LINE

6W/89

DATE OF BIRTH

03/29/1940

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/28/1970

HOME OF RECORD

COVINGTON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Fountain County

STATE

IN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SFC

STATUS

MIA

ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR RONALD EUGENE SMITH
POSTED ON 11.28.2020
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Veteran

Silver Star Medal Award

CITATION:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Ronald Eugene Smith, United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Special Forces Operations Augmentation, Command and Control Detachment Central, 5th Special Forces Group, (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, while serving as a member of a long-range reconnaissance team on a mission deep in enemy controlled territory on 28 November 1970 in the Republic of Vietnam. Immediately upon landing, the team received enemy small arms fire. Sergeant Smith engaged the enemy troops and called for air support to enable the team to break contact and move from the area. The team then moved down a large enemy trail, stopping three times to place antipersonnel mines. After two-and-one-half hours, the first mine exploded; followed by the second, and then the third. The team then came under attack by a large enemy force. Disregarding his personal safety, Sergeant Smith again called for air support while exposed to the enemy fire. The team detonated Claymore mines and succeeded in eliminating several of the enemy. Shortly thereafter, the relentless enemy began a second assault. Sergeant Smith moved to a completely unprotected position in an attempt to mark the enemy targets. He was struck by enemy fire and fell to the ground. The team leader attempted to reach Sergeant Smith but was driven back by the enemy fire. Air support arrived and delivered air strikes on the enemy, enabling the team to break contact. Sergeant First Class Smith's gallantry and self-sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military and reflect credit on him, his unit and the United States Army.
See https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/102885
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POSTED ON 9.9.2017
POSTED BY: Linda Smith-Cope & Jim Smith (Sister and Brother) - dlh

OUR BROTHER - OUR HERO

SFC Ronald E. Smith was inducted into the Indiana Military Veterans Hall Of Fame in 2015
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POSTED ON 7.17.2015
POSTED BY: ronald e smith

Honor and courage

I am also Ronald Eugene Smith of Little rock , Arkansas , A Vietnam vet.
I salute you soldier.
I wish it had been me that was lost so that your loved ones could have you.
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POSTED ON 10.17.2014

Final Mission of SFC Ronald E. Smith

Ronald E. Smith was born in Kingman Indiana on March 29, 1940. He joined the U.S. Navy as a young man, completed his commitment and then joined the Army. He advanced in the Army to Sergeant First Class, and received Special Forces training. He served in Germany until 1968, then was shipped to Vietnam, where he was assigned to Command and Control Central, MACV-SOG. SFC Ronald E. Smith was assigned to Special Operations Augmentations, 5th Special Forces Group. The 5th Special Forces channeled personnel into MACV-SOG (although it was not a Special Forces group) through Special Operations Augmentation (SOA), which provided their "cover" while under secret orders to MACV-SOG (Military Assistance Command, Vietnam Studies and Observation Group). MACV-SOG was a joint service high command unconventional warfare task force engaged in highly classified operations throughout Southeast Asia. The teams performed deep penetration missions of strategic reconnaissance and interdiction in Laos and Cambodia which were called, depending on the time frame and location, "Shining Brass" or "Prairie Fire" missions. On November 28, 1970, Smith was a rifleman and a member of a joint Vietnamese and American long range reconnaissance team (LRRP) named Kentucky/Louisiana on a mission in Attopeu Province Laos, near the tri-border area of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. At 1605 hours, the team came under enemy attack from a reinforced enemy company. The team became separated and several members were wounded. In the initial attack, Smith was hit by enemy fire, and was wounded and sought cover. The team leader immediately went to him to bring him to cover. When he turned Smith over, he saw that Smith had been hit in the forehead, chest and side by automatic weapons fire. While he was attempting to recover Smith, a B-40 rocket propelled grenade (RPG) hit the area, killing a Vietnamese member of the team who had also come to assist Smith. Enemy fire again struck Smith, and concussion from the rocket fire knocked the team leader unconscious. The remaining team members, who were Vietnamese, broke contact with the enemy, carrying the team leader with them. The team leader later stated that it was his opinion that Smith was dead. However, the Army told Smith's family that "based on past experience, we have learned that one cannot always accurately determine an individual's condition under the stress of battle." Therefore, the Department of the Army was reluctant to declare Smith dead. He was declared Missing in Action, and according to MAJ Gen. Kenneth G. Wickham on December 9, 1970, "the search is continuing," as no conclusive evidence was obtained that Smith was dead. No search could be made because of continuing hostile troop movement in the area. The area of loss was then classified, and Smith's family was informed only that he had been "operating deep inside enemy dominated territory." On January 15, 1971, COL Michael D. Healy wrote Smith's family that he offered "prayers for [Smith's] return. On April 28, 1971, the Army again wrote to Smith's family and stated that it had been decided he could not have survived the incident. He was declared Killed in Action/Body Not Recovered. The action was based on the "additional information" that the team leader "definitely determined that [Smith] died of his wounds." On August 14, 1973, MAJ General Bowers wrote Smith's family and told them that the area of Smith's loss could now be released, and that he had been lost in Laos. He enclosed an amended Report of Casualty (DD1300) reflecting that information. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
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POSTED ON 11.2.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SFC Ronald Eugene Smith, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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