MARVIN G SHIELDS
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HONORED ON PANEL 2E, LINE 7 OF THE WALL

MARVIN GLEN SHIELDS

WALL NAME

MARVIN G SHIELDS

PANEL / LINE

2E/7

DATE OF BIRTH

12/30/1939

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NGAI

DATE OF CASUALTY

06/10/1965

HOME OF RECORD

PORT TOWNSEND

COUNTY OF RECORD

Jefferson County

STATE

WA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

CMA3

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR MARVIN GLEN SHIELDS
POSTED ON 1.14.2021

President Johnson Awards Medal of Honor to Seabee Marvin Shields' Widow

President Lyndon B. Johnson presents the Medal of Honor to the widow of Marvin G. Shields, on September 13, 1966.
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POSTED ON 1.13.2021
POSTED BY: Jury Washington

Thank You For Your Valiant Service Sailor.

We can never truly repay the great debt we owe our fallen heroes. May those who served never be forgotten. Rest in peace CMA3. Shields, I salute your brave soul. My heart goes out to you and your family. Fair seas and calm winds shipmate. Thank you from a Coast Guard vet.
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POSTED ON 12.28.2020
POSTED BY: ANON

Never forgotten

On the remembrance of your 81st birthday, your sacrifice is not forgotten.

"Greater love hath no man, than that man lay down his life for a friend."

Semper Fortis.
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POSTED ON 9.2.2019

Attack on Dong Xoai Special Forces Camp – June 9-10, 1965

On June 9, 1965, a Viet Cong force estimated at 1500-2000 strong attacked the Dong Xoai Special Forces Camp, located approximately 60 miles north of Saigon in Phuoc Long Province, RVN. The camp was occupied by eleven men of a U.S Army Special Forces team, a Vietnamese force of approximately 400 men, and nine U.S. Navy Seabees. The attack occurred shortly before midnight with mortar and 57mm recoilless-rifle fire. Some of the first mortar rounds struck the communications building, medical aid station, and the quarters where the Americans were sleeping, inflicting casualties in the first moments of the attack. Friendly aircraft arrived to drop flares followed by armed helicopters which bombed and strafed the areas north and west of the camp. The Viet Cong pressed the assault, overrunning the west berm of the north area of the camp. The defenders were scattered and suffered many casualties. American and Vietnamese aircraft arrived at daybreak, the defenders directing highly effective air strikes against the attacking enemy. Shortly after noon, rescue helicopters came in through the Viet Cong fire and successfully evacuated thirteen American survivors. The Viet Cong withdrew on the morning of June 11th, and the remaining Americans survivors were lifted out by rescue helicopters. Twenty Americans died in the battle, including three Special Forces soldiers: SSG Donald C. Dedmon, SGT Charles O. Jenkins Jr., and SFC Bobby Russell; and two Seabees: SWF2 William C. Hoover and CMA3 Marvin G. Shields. Of the surviving 15 Americans, 14 were wounded. Additionally, about 43 CIDG Montagnards and South Vietnamese troops were killed. Outside of the camp, American deaths included eight helicopter crewmen, four from the 118th Aviation Company: pilot CPT Walter L. Hall, co-pilot Donald R. Saegaert, crew chief SSG Joseph J. Compa Jr., and gunner SGT Craig L. Hagen; and four from the 82nd Aviation Battalion: pilot CWO Raymond C. Galbraith, co-pilot WO Zoltan A. Kovacs, crew chief William R. Batchelder, and gunner PFC Walter R. Gray. Five U.S. Army advisers were also killed: SP4 Ronald E. Blake, SSG Robert L. Curlee Jr., LTC Bruce G. Johnson, CPT Edward E. Krukowski, and SFC Fred M. Owens, three from helicopter crashes and two killed while attached to South Vietnamese units. More than 400 South Vietnamese soldiers died in fights in the outskirts of the camp. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, historynet.com, and the publication The Military Engineer (November-December 1965 issue)]
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POSTED ON 8.4.2016

Final Mission of CMA3 Marvin G. Shields

During the night of June 9, 1965, a paramilitary Civilian Irregular Defense Group (CIDG) camp and adjacent district headquarters compound just west of Dong Xoai in Phuoc Long Province came under attack. Most of Seabee Team 1104 had arrived from Tay Ninh City a few days earlier to improve the CIDG camp. For the next fourteen hours, Seabees, Special Forces troops, and advisers fought alongside their allies against an overwhelming enemy. Following an intense mortar barrage, the attackers breached the barbed wire defenses, overran the CIDG compound, and penetrated the district headquarters compound. The surviving Americans and some South Vietnamese held out in the district headquarters building, calling in air strikes. One wounded Seabee, Construction Mechanic Third Class Marvin G. Shields, carried the seriously wounded Special Forces commander from one of the defensive berms to the district headquarters building. Then Shields and a Special Forces officer, 2LT Charles Q. Williams, second in command of the Special Forces detachment, manning a 3.5-inch rocket launcher, destroyed a Viet Cong machine-gun position. Shields was wounded again and later died aboard an evacuation helicopter. By then most of the Americans had been picked up by U.S. Army helicopters. Two of the Seabees, who had become separated during the fighting, were later found by a South Vietnamese Army relief force still holding out in the area. For a time, the 173d Airborne Brigade was poised to intervene, but the enemy withdrawal eliminated the need. [Taken from Engineers at War by Adrian G. Traas]
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