STEPHEN P SCHRIVER
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HONORED ON PANEL 6W, LINE 16 OF THE WALL

STEPHEN PAUL SCHRIVER

WALL NAME

STEPHEN P SCHRIVER

PANEL / LINE

6W/16

DATE OF BIRTH

10/12/1950

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TIN

DATE OF CASUALTY

10/22/1970

HOME OF RECORD

RANDOLPH

COUNTY OF RECORD

Kennebec County

STATE

ME

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP5

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STEPHEN PAUL SCHRIVER
POSTED ON 12.19.2023
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you.....

Say not in grief he is no more, but live in thankfulness that he was.
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POSTED ON 11.21.2023

Ground Casualty

On May 16, 1971, a New York Times article described heroin use by American troops in Vietnam had reached epidemic proportions. The piece reported that 10 to 15 percent of lower-ranking enlisted men were heroin users, and military officials working in drug‐suppression estimated that as much as a quarter of all enlisted personnel, more than 60,000 men, were hooked. They added that some field surveys reported units with more than 50 percent of the men on heroin. In Vietnam, the drug was plentiful, cheap, and 95 percent pure. Its effects could casually be achieved through smoking or snorting, as compared to the U.S., where the drug was impure, only about five percent heroin, and had to be main-lined or injected into the bloodstream to achieve a comparable high. The habit, which cost $100 a day to maintain in the U.S., cost less than $5 a day in Vietnam. SP5 Stephen P. Schriver was a Heavy Construction Equipment Operator serving with the 544th Transportation Company, 80th General Services Group, Army Support Command, 1st Logistical Command, U.S. Army Republic of Vietnam. On the evening of September 24, 1970, Schriver reportedly ingested drugs identified as “cocaine” at Chu Lai Base Area in Quang Tin Province, RVN. As cocaine was unavailable to U.S. troops serving in Southeast Asia, it is probable that the illicit drug was heroin. The following morning, Schriver was hospitalized at the 93rd Evacuation Hospital at Chu Lai for aspiration (inhaling the contents of his stomach). Aspiration occurs when foreign material is inhaled into the airway. In healthy young men, it may occur during sleep when the sedating effects of heroin impair cough and gag reflexes. Cocaine, conversely, is a stimulant drug. Schriver developed aspiration pneumonitis and was medically evacuated to the U.S. Army 249th General Hospital at Camp Drake in Asaka, Japan, where he expired at 7:50 Am on October 22, 1970. On January 20, 1971, a (corrected) final casualty report was issued listing the cause of death as “aspiration and pneumonitis secondary to overdose of drugs.” Schriver was 20 years old. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “G.I. Heroin Addiction Epidemic in Vietnam.” New York Times (New York, NY), May 16, 1971]
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POSTED ON 12.30.2021
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp5 Stephen Schriver, Thank you for your service as a Heavy Construction Equipment Operator. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 10.8.2020
POSTED BY: ANON

Never forgotten

SP5 Stephen Paul Schriver is buried in A15XB, L07N, 1/2 G1 of the Litchfield Plains Cemetery in Litchfield, ME.

He served with 544th Transportation Company, 80th GS Group, Army Support Command DaNang, 1st Logistical Command, US Army Vietnam (Coffelt Database).

Your sacrifice is not forgotten.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 10.22.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SP5 Stephen Paul Schriver, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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