LESLIE V SAMPSON
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HONORED ON PANEL 1E, LINE 2 OF THE WALL

LESLIE VERNE SAMPSON

WALL NAME

LESLIE V SAMPSON

PANEL / LINE

1E/2

DATE OF BIRTH

04/09/1936

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/23/1961

HOME OF RECORD

RICHEY

COUNTY OF RECORD

Dawson County

STATE

MT

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

SSGT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR LESLIE VERNE SAMPSON
POSTED ON 9.10.2019
POSTED BY: Trace Malinowski

Welcome Home

Dear S/Sgt Sampson:

When I was a kid, I was at the Greene/Dreher/Sterling Fair in Newfoundland, Pennsylvania. A veteran was selling MIA bracelets and I bought one. It bore your name and sacrifice. Over the years, you went to high school and college with me. You rode horses, played lacrosse, lifeguarded, became a scuba instructor, a cave diver, and you were there the first time I fell in love. I'm now nearly twice your age when you lost your life in service to our country. One day, they found you in the jungle and brought you home. Welcome home. Thank you. Rest in glory with God. - Trace Malinowski
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POSTED ON 12.18.2014
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We remember

Leslie is buried at Dawson Memorial Park, Glendive, Dawson County,MT. His remains were recovered on 7/11/1991 and identified on 11/29/1991.
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POSTED ON 8.30.2014
POSTED BY: Bryan Simmons

Article Missing in Laos

Found this article. You are not forgotten.
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POSTED ON 5.22.2014

Final Mission of SSGT Leslie V. Sampson

Henry Kissinger once predicted that an "unfortunate" by-product of "limited political engagements" would be personnel who could not be recovered. On March 23, 1961, one of the first group of Americans to fall into that "unfortunate" category were shot from the sky by Pathet Lao antiaircraft guns. Most Americans at that time did not even know that the United States had military personnel in Southeast Asia. In fact, most Americans had not even heard of the name "Laos". The Geneva Agreements had yet to be signed; air rescue teams had yet to arrive in Southeast Asia. The C-47 aircraft crew consisted of 1LT Ralph W. Magee, pilot; 1LT Oscar B. Weston, co-pilot; 2LT Glenn Matteson, navigator; SSGT Alfons A. Bankowski, flight engineer; SSGT Frederick T. Garside, assistant flight engineer; SSGT Leslie V. Sampson, radio operator; and passengers MAJ Lawrence R. Bailey and WO1 Edgar W. Weitkamp. Bailey and Weitkamp were assigned to the Army Attache Office at Vientiane, Laos. The aircraft crew was all Air Force personnel flying from the 315th Air Division, Osan Airbase, Korea. This C-47 was a specially modified intelligence-gathering SC-47 which took off from Vientiane for Saigon. The passengers and crew were bound for "R & R" in the "Paris of the Orient". Before heading for Saigon, the pilot turned north toward Xieng Khouangville, a Pathet Lao stronghold on the eastern edge of the Plain of Jars. The crew, experienced in intelligence collection, planned to use their radio-direction finding equipment to determine the frequencies being used by Soviet pilots to locate the Xieng Khouangville airfield through the dense fog that often blanketed the region. Pathet Lao anti-aircraft guns downed the plane, shearing off a wing and sending the aircraft plummeting toward the jungle. MAJ Bailey, who always wore a parachute when he flew, jumped from the falling aircraft and was captured by the Pathet Lao. Bailey spent seventeen months as a prisoner in Sam Neua, the Pathet Lao headquarters near the North Vietnamese border, before being repatriated after the signing of the Geneva Agreements on Laos in 1962. The caves at Sam Neua were said to have held scores of American prisoners during and after the war. The seven men lost on March 23, 1961 were the first of many hundreds of American personnel shot from the sky only to disappear in the jungles of Laos. Four Lao sources stated that 7 of the 8 personnel on board died in the crash of the aircraft, and were buried in the vicinity. [Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.com]
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POSTED ON 10.15.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SSGT Leslie Verne Sampson, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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