THOMAS E RAMSEY
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HONORED ON PANEL 36W, LINE 27 OF THE WALL

THOMAS EARLE RAMSEY

WALL NAME

THOMAS E RAMSEY

PANEL / LINE

36W/27

DATE OF BIRTH

05/04/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

KONTUM

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/15/1968

HOME OF RECORD

ASHEVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Buncombe County

STATE

NC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CPL

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR THOMAS EARLE RAMSEY
POSTED ON 7.17.2021
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Cpl Thomas Ramsey, Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Independence Day just passed. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 5.22.2020

Final Mission of PFC Thomas E. Ramsey

The reconnaissance scout units within the U.S. Army’s 4th Infantry Division were Long-range reconnaissance patrol teams (LRRP’s or “lurps”). They were small, well-armed reconnaissance teams that patrolled deep into enemy-held territory. During Operation Binh Tay-MacArthur, the 4th Infantry Division was responsible for the defense of the provincial and district capitals of the Central Highlands of South Vietnam. From the Cambodian border several outlets of the southern Ho Chi Minh Trail fed supplies and replacements for the enemy from numerous large bases. While patrolling throughout Pleiku Province, LRRP units would seek out and report on the flow of men and material of the North Vietnamese Army. At 7:15 PM on December 15, 1968, a LRRP team from Headquarters & Headquarters Company (HHC), 1st Brigade, LRP 1A, was operating eleven miles southeast of Ben Het village in Kontum Province, RVN, when they received a burst of AK-47 fire. One team member, PFC Thomas E. Ramsey, was critically wounded. While the team evaded the enemy force, communications was lost with LRP 1A. At midnight, Ramsey reportedly expired, and due to the tactical situation, the team had to leave his body behind while it continued to evade. At 7:50 AM, an O-1 Bird Dog reconnaissance aircraft from the 219th Aviation Company (Recon) reestablished communication with the team. Shortly thereafter, the patrol was picked up. A volunteer LRRP team and tracker team recovered Ramsey and were extracted at 2:55 PM. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “Operational Report, 4th Infantry Division - Lessons Learned - re: Operation Binh Tay” at ttu.edu]
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POSTED ON 12.17.2012
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering an American Hero

Dear CPL Thomas Earle Ramsey, Sir



As a fellow North Carolinian, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.



May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you.



With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir



Curt Carter (son of Sgt. Ardon William Carter, 101st Airborne, February 4, 1966, South Vietnam)


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POSTED ON 8.19.2011
POSTED BY: Jim and Tom Reece

Salute to a Fellow Tar Heel Veteran

You gave your life for your Country and for this we Salute You.
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POSTED ON 7.11.2010
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Thomas is buried at Whitt Cemetery in Mars Hill, NC. BSM PH
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