LEWIS D PROBART
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (3)
HONORED ON PANEL 20W, LINE 11 OF THE WALL

LEWIS DEVERN PROBART

WALL NAME

LEWIS D PROBART

PANEL / LINE

20W/11

DATE OF BIRTH

03/27/1943

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PHOUC TUY

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/17/1969

HOME OF RECORD

POCATELLO

COUNTY OF RECORD

Power County

STATE

ID

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CAPT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR LEWIS DEVERN PROBART
POSTED ON 4.1.2020
POSTED BY: Nick Quigley OAM - 104 Sig Sqn 1733706'

I always remember our time together . . .

I'm an Australian Vietnam Veteran who served with 104 Signal Sqn from Nov 1968 to September 1969.  I was an Operator Radio and as such we went with whoever needed communications. One of my postings was with the US Advisory Unit. There was Sargent Clem.... NANCE and Capt Lewis PROBART.  We were based in the Trang Bom Rubber plantation with a platoon of 2/52 ARVN soldiers and operated as an observation base. On one of our trips into Xuan Loc I took the attached photo. Nance on the left with arms crossed and Probart on the right. I have always remembered our time together.
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POSTED ON 7.18.2019
POSTED BY: Janice Current

An American Hero

Thank you for your service and your sacrifice. Thank you for stepping up and answering your country's call. Rest easy knowing you will never be forgotten.
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POSTED ON 1.7.2018
POSTED BY: wkillian@smjuhsd.org

Final Mission of CPT Lewis D. Probart

On July 17, 1969, a U.S. Army helicopter UH-1H (tail number 66-16828) from the 68th Assault Helicopter Company crashed after suffering a power loss in Long Khanh Province, RVN, resulting in the death of one crewman and one passenger. The accident occurred in the late afternoon after the crew had been conducted several combat support flights during the day. At approximately 1600 hours, the aircraft was directed to a landing zone (LZ) near Xuan Loc to extract a load of captured enemy equipment. The LZ was approximately 50 meters long and 30 meters wide, and was surrounded by 180-200 foot trees on all sides. There was one small area at the south end of the LZ that was barely suitable for landing. After landing to the south, approximately 700 lbs. of miscellaneous captured equipment were loaded aboard the aircraft. Aircraft commander WO1 Noel K. Garrison picked the aircraft up to a hover while a ground guide, SFC Clark, cleared him of the obstacles. As he came to a high hover (approximately 30 feet), WO1 Garrison executed a 200 degree right pedal turn and continued a vertical climb out to the north-northeast, approximately 020 degrees. As the aircraft passed over the tree line, Garrison lowered the nose to gain forward airspeed and pulled additional power to prevent from settling into the trees. When additional power was added, the RPM bled severely, and the aircraft began a slow turn to the right. No corrective action was taken, and the aircraft continued to turn to the right, while moving over the trees in the direction of takeoff. After the first 360 degree turn, the aircraft began to spin faster and moved back over the LZ to the south. The aircraft spun several more times to the right before contacting the trees approximately 30 meters to the south of the LZ. The helicopter inverted when it contacted the trees and fell, impacting on its top. The crew and one passenger were effectively restrained by seat belts and remained in the aircraft after impact. One passenger, CPT Lewis D. Probart, unfastened his seat belt and is believed to have been thrown from the aircraft as it contacted the trees and inverted. He was found about 3 meters southeast of the wreckage with fatal injuries. One of the trees that was knocked down by the helicopter fell across him and pinned him to the ground. The other passenger was knocked unconscious and was hanging in his seat belt. He was removed from the aircraft by SFC Clark. The crew chief was wearing a safety harness and was hanging from the retaining ring. He was able to free himself from the wreckage. The gunner was conscious and was not seriously injured. SFC Clark helped him free himself from the wreckage. SFC Clark then helped get the Garrison and co-pilot out of the severely damaged cockpit. Garrison did not appear to be seriously injured but was unconscious. The co-pilot was pinned in the crushed side of the cockpit, and the gunner, SFC Clark, and another soldier worked for approximately twenty minutes to free him. An aircraft that was in the area at the time of the crash called for medevac helicopters, and they arrived approximately 30 minutes after the crash and took the injured personnel to the hospital. Garrison later succumbed to his injuries. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and vhpa.org]
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POSTED ON 7.17.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear Captain Lewis Devern Probart, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 7.31.2012

Remembrance

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