HONORED ON PANEL 20W, LINE 42 OF THE WALL

LARRY DELARNARD AIKEN

WALL NAME

LARRY D AIKEN

PANEL / LINE

20W/42

DATE OF BIRTH

12/24/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TIN

DATE OF CASUALTY

07/25/1969

HOME OF RECORD

JAMAICA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Queens

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR LARRY DELARNARD AIKEN
POSTED ON 5.9.2022

Final Mission of SP4 Larry D. Aiken

At approximately 1:30 AM on May 13, 1969, the South Vietnamese Regional Forces camp at Nuc Yon, five miles south of Thong Hai in Quang Tin Province, RVN, received a heavy ground attack. After radio contact with the camp was lost, a U.S. reaction force was sent to retake the camp. One tank and three armored personnel carriers were knocked out as the force was repelled. B and C Troops of 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment were sent to retrieve the vehicles but were also repelled. The contacts resulted in three U.S. killed, sixteen wounded, and one man missing, infantryman SP4 Larry D. Aiken from 2nd Platoon, C Company, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade. Nearly two months later, on July 10, 1969, a Viet Cong (VC) “Hoi Chanh” defector led a joint U.S.-ARVN (Army of the Republic of Vietnam) prisoner of war recovery operation into a VC hospital in Quang Tin Province, RVN. The Hoi Chanh led forces into the area where he had seen an American prisoner on or about July 1st. The rescue forces were air assaulted by U.S. helicopters into the area. Because of the difficult nature of the terrain, an ARVN soldier was lowered by rope into the jungle from a hovering helicopter to reach the prisoner of war, identified as Aiken, and a U.S. trooper, PFC Robert Bohler, rappelled down another rope to assist. Aiken was found lying face down outside the hut where the defector had reported seeing him. He was unconscious and suffering from a fresh head wound (not a gunshot wound). It was believed Aiken was clubbed repeatedly with a rifle butt because he was unable to travel due to a previously broken leg. His guards beat him over the head to kill him rather than fire a shot tipping off their location to the rescue force. The rescuers carried Aiken 300 yards down a stream bed to a waiting helicopter. He was flown to the 91st Evacuation Hospital in Chu Lai where he remained in a coma until his death on July 25, 1969. Of forty-five raids mounted by U.S. forces to rescue American prisoners in Vietnam between 1966 and 1970, Aiken was the only American ever recovered. [“NVA Beat, Hurt GI.” Pacific Stars & Stripes, July 19, 1969; also, “Army 1969 Spec Ops Grp Cmd History” at ttu.edu]
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POSTED ON 12.24.2021
POSTED BY: Donna Moore

Happy Heavenly Birthday

You will forever remain in our hearts and prayers
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POSTED ON 4.14.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

As long as you are remembered you will never truly die.
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POSTED ON 12.24.2019
POSTED BY: Jury Washington

Thank You For Your Valiant Service Soldier.

Without people like you our great nation wouldn't exist. As fellow native of Jamaica Queens, I salute your brave soul. As a fellow vet I say rest in peace SP4. Aiken, you are not forgotten.
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POSTED ON 12.24.2019
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Specialist Four Larry Delarnard Aiken, Served with the 2nd Platoon, Company C, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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