DALE A PERKINS
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (4)
HONORED ON PANEL 12E, LINE 15 OF THE WALL

DALE ALLEN PERKINS

WALL NAME

DALE A PERKINS

PANEL / LINE

12E/15

DATE OF BIRTH

09/15/1939

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/03/1966

HOME OF RECORD

OREGON CITY

COUNTY OF RECORD

Clackamas County

STATE

OR

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

2LT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DALE ALLEN PERKINS
POSTED ON 4.22.2021
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Lt Dale Perkins, Thank you for your service as an Infantry Unit Commander. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Today is Earth Day. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
read more read less
POSTED ON 2.2.2019

Dale

Dale....Honoring you...You will never be forgotten.....God Bless
read more read less
POSTED ON 7.31.2016
POSTED BY: [email protected]rg

Final Mission of 2LT Dale A. Perkins

Operation Attleboro was a search and destroy operation conducted northwest of Dau Tieng, Tay Ninh Province, RVN, during September 14 – November 24, 1966. While the initial fighting was light, in late October U.S. forces, consisting of the 196th Light Infantry Brigade and the 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment (25th Infantry Division), encountered the 9th Viet Cong Division, resulting in a major three-day battle. It was a slugfest of small units set amid treacherous terrain of tangled forest, overgrown jungle, and booby-trapped elephant grass. On November 3, 1966, members of B Company, 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade, were dropped off by trucks near the combat area and began a march to probe for trails. The moved mainly through elephant grass and across a few bone-dry rice paddies. Right after the noon hour when the temperature was around 104 degrees, the trail they followed sprouted many directions. The company split and one squad, led by 2LT Dale A. Perkins, continued along a trail that passed a tall mahogany tree. Its 18-inch base was heavily laced with vines and was circled with small shrubs, the trunk partly rotted away. The point man was 15 paces ahead of the squad when he passed the tree. Suddenly, a large blast was heard as a Viet Cong command-detonated claymore mine exploded from its well-camouflaged position among the roots of the tree. The lead man, PFC Ronald E. Hesson was killed outright, his body badly mangled. The second man, SP4 James M. Klink, was also killed, his shattered M-16 still clutched in his hands. 2LT Perkins went down also, his chest crushed in, and his RTO (radio telephone operator) lay next to him, badly wounded. Behind the RTO, on the left side of the trail, was SSGT Donald T. Cassidy, with wounds around the head and shoulders, from which he later died. Four others would die, including SP4 Robert L. Fowble Jr., PFC Joel Fuller, PFC John R. Johnson, and SP4 Thomas A. Lawless. Several more men, all wounded, though less grievously, were strung out over 20 meters of trail to the rear of SSGT Cassidy. Eighteen total were struck down by the blast. An LZ (landing zone) had to be cut away within the elephant grass just off the edge of the forest, and the dead and non-walking wounded had to be toted out in ponchos. The backbreaking labor caused even more casualties as several men passed out from the heat. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, wikipedia.org, and the book “Ambush” by S.L.A. Marshall]
read more read less
POSTED ON 10.19.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear 2LT Dale Allen Perkins, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
read more read less
POSTED ON 1.9.2011
POSTED BY: Gil Thibeau

Served with him before Nam 1961-1964

Dale and I were stationed first with NORAD in Winthrop,MA. We were both shipped off to Korea in'62, then to ElPaso in '64. I was discharged in '64. Dale re-upped and went to OCS. He was a dear friend for the 3 years I knew him. Can't wait to meet him again in Paradise.
read more read less