STANLEY E OLMSTEAD
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (2)
HONORED ON PANEL 2E, LINE 125 OF THE WALL

STANLEY EDWARD OLMSTEAD

WALL NAME

STANLEY E OLMSTEAD

PANEL / LINE

2E/125

DATE OF BIRTH

11/12/1933

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

10/17/1965

HOME OF RECORD

MARSHALL

COUNTY OF RECORD

Logan County

STATE

OK

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

CDR

STATUS

MIA

ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STANLEY EDWARD OLMSTEAD
POSTED ON 4.22.2021
POSTED BY: Kathy Bruton

I had his POW bracelet

Although it broke long ago, I’ve never forgotten Commander Stanley Olmstead. 10/17/65
After all these years I still remember his name and have been to the wall in his memory. May God bless him.
read more read less
POSTED ON 2.21.2021
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Cdr Stanley Olmstead, Thank you for your service as an Unrestricted Line Officer - Pilot on the USS INDEPENDENCE. You are still MIA. Please come home. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Presidents’, and Valentine’s Days just passed, and Lent has begun. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Be at peace.
read more read less
POSTED ON 11.10.2020
POSTED BY: John zalnieratis

Forever grateful

Still have MIA bracelet from the 70s. Still appreciate the sacrifice Commander Olmstead made along with his family. Will never forget and i am FOREVER Grateful!
read more read less
POSTED ON 7.25.2019

Final Mission of LCDR Stanley E. Olmstead

On October 17, 1965, LCDR Stanley E. Olmstead was the pilot of a U.S Navy F-4B Phantom II (#151515) from Fighter Squadron 84 (VF-84) “Jolly Rogers,” Carrier Wing Seven (CVW-7) aboard the USS Independence. With him was Radio Intercept Officer (RIO) LTJG Porter A. Halyburton. They were the number two aircraft in a flight of four on a combat mission to attack anti-aircraft sites for a day strike mission on the Thai Nguyen bridge northeast of Hanoi, NVN. About 40 miles east of the city of Thai Nguyen, their aircraft was seen to be hit by anti-aircraft fire. Other pilots in the area saw it hit the side of a mountain and explode. They did not see any parachutes nor hear any radio transmissions. U.S. aircraft passed over the crash site and determined that there was no possibility of survival. However, it was later learned that Halyburton had survived, and was captured. Upon his release from North Vietnam in February 1973, Halyburton reported that while at low-level, their jet was hit by anti-aircraft fire. Halyburton noticed that the pilot’s canopy and helmet were gone, and Olmstead’s head was bowed. The Phantom remained in level flight, and while Halyburton attempted to raise the pilot on the intercom, he lost his oxygen mask. As the aircraft approached karst rock outcroppings, Halyburton ejected. He saw no other parachutes in his descent. During his captivity, no further word was heard about Olmstead, but he believes he went down with the jet. Olmstead was promoted to Commander during the time he was missing. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and pownetwork.org]
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.17.2019
POSTED BY: Nelson Lee

Great man of VF-84

I was a plane captain with VF-84 during VF-84's Vietnam tour in 1965. The pilot's and RIO's of VF-84 were superb men. Cdr. Olmstead will always be missed. I've seen his RIO, Porter Halyburton who spent 7 1/2 years as a POW.
read more read less
1 2 3 7