OLIVER A BEST JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 25W, LINE 9 OF THE WALL

OLIVER ADRIAN BEST JR

WALL NAME

OLIVER A BEST JR

PANEL / LINE

25W/9

DATE OF BIRTH

12/14/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

TAY NINH

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/06/1969

HOME OF RECORD

NEW YORK

COUNTY OF RECORD

New York City

STATE

NY

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

1LT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR OLIVER ADRIAN BEST JR
POSTED ON 12.14.2021
POSTED BY: Donna Moore

Happy Heavenly Birthday

You will forever remain in our hearts and prayers
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POSTED ON 8.31.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you.....

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. As long as you are remembered you will always be with us...
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POSTED ON 12.14.2019
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

First Lieutenant Oliver Adrian Best Jr., Served with the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 12.14.2019
POSTED BY: Jury Washington

Thank You For Your Valiant Service Soldier.

We can never truly repay the debt we owe our fallen heroes. I salute your brave soul
1LT. Best, for without people like you our great nation would not exist. Rest in peace.
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POSTED ON 8.1.2018

Attack on Camp Carolyn – May 6, 1969

In the early morning hours of May 6, 1969, Camp Carolyn, a remote U.S. artillery base near the Cambodian border in Tay Ninh Province, RVN, was attacked by an estimated 300 North Vietnamese Army regulars who charged out of the bamboo forest surrounding the camp in a desperate attempt to overrun the position. The NVA broke through the barbed wire defenses at two points and occupied and held six of the perimeter bunkers and one of the gun positions for nearly two hours. The assault was preceded by a heavy barrage of rocket and mortar fire. After penetrating the perimeter, the enemy ran at the American bunkers, hurling grenades and satchel charges and firing AK-47’s. The force of the attack drove out the U.S. soldiers, and the dugouts were immediately occupied by the NVA. The charge was stopped when the Americans shot holes into the fuel drums near the bunkers and ignited flowing rivers of gas to create a flaming barrier, which effectively blocked further enemy penetration. From that point, the Americans counterattacked with all available personnel, the officers involved being killed at the head of their troops. Artillerymen, supply and signal personnel, and engineers fought and died as emergency infantry reserves. Their counterattacks were hurled against both enemy penetrations, but the most violent fighting occurred on the northern side of Carolyn, where a seesaw battle raged for possession of the 155mm howitzer position. During the course of the battle, this weapon exchanged hands 3 times in hand-to-hand fighting decided at close range with rifles and E-tools (entrenching tools, or shovels). Another light howitzer section was caught in an enemy crossfire between a heavy machine gun and rifles until the U.S. artillerymen managed to turn their lowered muzzle and pump “Beehive” flechettes into the enemy. All enemy automatic weapon fire against the howitzer was instantly silenced. As Cavalry counterattacks continued, the Americans reestablished the perimeter, and the enemy force began withdrawing, breaking contact at 6:00 AM. The action against Carolyn resulted in 10 U.S. killed, 62 wounded. Enemy losses were 101 killed and 29 captured. The lost Americans included 1LT Oliver A. Best Jr., PFC Richard J. Daley, PFC Paul J. Kronthaler, CPL Jackie R. McKenzie, CPL William L. Negrini, SGT Fruto J. Oquendo, SGT Gilbert G. Palacio, SP4 Foster L. Sonnier, SP4 Jose Soto-Concepcion, and CPT Joseph Woodard. Two weeks after the hard-fought defense, the U.S. abandoned the firebase. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “GI’s Bury 100 Enemy, Rebuild Remote Camp’s Defenses.” Atlanta Journal Constitution, May 7, 1969; other web sources also used]
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