JOSEPH BENOSKI JR
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (3)
HONORED ON PANEL 12W, LINE 48 OF THE WALL

JOSEPH BENOSKI JR

WALL NAME

JOSEPH BENOSKI JR

PANEL / LINE

12W/48

DATE OF BIRTH

10/23/1933

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/27/1970

HOME OF RECORD

BIRMINGHAM

COUNTY OF RECORD

Jefferson County

STATE

AL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

LTC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JOSEPH BENOSKI JR
POSTED ON 10.22.2013

Daddy

Hi Daddy. I wish I would have known you like other people did but I was only 3 when you left. Hearing stories about you just makes me so proud that I had a wonderful daddy like you. You were obviously a great man who cared about his family, friends and his men in the military. Tomorrow would have been your 80th birthday. Happy birthday Daddy. I will always love you.
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POSTED ON 7.27.2013

GREAT MAN

THIS GUY AND MR. QUICK BROUGHT US ICE CREAM AND REAL EGGS UP TO FB BARBARA VN. WHEN I WAS WITH AN ADVANCE PARTY. WE ALL (12) ADMIRED HIM AND QUICK FOR THE THINGS THEY DID JUST CUZ THEY WERE GOOD GUYS. IT WAS NOT A GOOD PLACE--THEY WERE SHOT DOWNED OFF THE SIDE OF OUR HILL TRYING TO PROTECT US "ME".
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POSTED ON 11.17.2010
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Joseph is buried at Oakland Cemetery, Birmingham,AL. SS LM BAM-OLC ARCOM PH
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POSTED ON 11.14.2010

LTC Joseph Benoski Jr.'s Last Mission

(Recounted by 1Lt Richard Kreutzer [USAR retired] B Btry 139th FA FSB Barbara, I Corps South Vietnam, who was the XO of B Btry 139 FA located on FSB Barbara, I Corps during this incident. The LTC flying with WO Quick was his BNCO, LTC Joseph Benoski Jr.) On 32770, B Btry (two 8' howitzers and two 175 mm guns) 139th FA were doing normal fire missions and gun maintenance. The road leading to FSB Barbara had a single purpose, it connected the FSB with the coast. We thought the only personnel using this road was our unit and our BN supply tail. WO Quick flew our BNCO onto FSB Barbara in the afternoon for the CO's routine inspection circuit. While he was on our pad a team of gun ships appeared over the north side of the road about 500 meters away and in the valley. I do not know why the gun ships were in the area because we had no reports of concentrations of NVA below FSB Barbara. What I do know is that the cobras did not have a LOH with them which we noted was unusual and they appeared interested in an area a couple of hundred meters north of the road. WO Quick on the FSB Barbara pad received a call from the gun ships saying that their LOH was held up and asked if WO Quick would go in for a closer look and drop smoke if they saw anything. He evidently agreed because the BNCO came over to me and relayed the gun ships request that we hold any fires to our north. The BNCO and WO Quick then departed our pad and immediately began several low passes. I could see a thin string of smoke come out of the trees and the gun ships rolled in and worked the area over. WO Quick and my BNCO returned to FSB Barbara and I met them at the pad. The BNCO shouted to me that he needed a M-79 and ammo from us as he could see NVA moving on the ground and wanted to 'get some'. He asked if I wanted to go along and my battery commander, who had come up, intervened and told him I could not be spared if we received heavy calls for fire for our battery. I gave the BNCO my RTO's M-79 and sent a soldier to the ammo bunker for rounds. While he was away, the BNCO told me that he had been shooting at NVA with his .45 cal pistol during their previous passes. The soldier returned with the ammo. WO Quick and the BNCO left the pad and started making low passes again. I did not see any additional smoke popped nor evidence of the M-79 being fired from our vantage point on the FSB. WO Quick made about 2-3 passes and then we saw tracers coming up nearthrough the aircraft and it immediately 'stopped in the trees', in other words it crashed quickly. We observed neither explosion nor fire. We tried calling the aircraft from our FDC, but there was no contact. When the 101st Airmobile Div rear heard that an artillery LTC had been shot down with radio codes books and maps the rescue effort built quickly. A LOH arrived piloted by WO Russ Brown and took over doing the scouting for the gun ships. It was now late afternoon. We could not fire our howitzersguns in support because the incident happened just below our FSB and below the minimum range for the guns, so we watched. A Huey medevac was sent in and shot up. It limped off and over a ridge. Next came a 'Jolly Green' AF helicopter. For a few seconds there was a tremendous exchange of tracer fire between the ground NVA .51 cal machine gun and the heavy machine guns on the chopper. Then that chopper too turned and went over the ridge. TAC air and gun ships were now working out on the ground. We heard that the gun ships spotted movement that might have been an American, but were weary of being sucked in. I thought I saw the Blues being inserted in the failing light. It was reported to us that they could not reach the crash site and went into a NDP for the night. The next day it was reported to us that the Blues found the aircraft and bodies. After the incident: About a week after the incident, an ARVN infantry unit without an American adviser was sweeping the road near our FSB and ran into heavy resistance. We lowered our tubes and fire minimum charge for several hours using delay and quick fuses on many bunkers. It was so close that I could adjust the rounds onto different bunkers using binos from our FSB. As a result of this action it was determined and reported to us that the NVA had a large concentration in bunkers on both sides of the road and had been there for many months. The reason they did not hit our FSB, it is speculated, is that they were using the road at night to run troops and supplies to the coast, 10 miles away and did not want to lose that ability by fighting there. [Taken from vhpa.org]

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POSTED ON 3.27.2009
POSTED BY: Bob Ross

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Frye – 1932


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