VIRGIL A MURRAY
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HONORED ON PANEL 6E, LINE 18 OF THE WALL

VIRGIL ARTHUR MURRAY

WALL NAME

VIRGIL A MURRAY

PANEL / LINE

6E/18

DATE OF BIRTH

06/23/1930

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/17/1966

HOME OF RECORD

LARNED

COUNTY OF RECORD

Pawnee County

STATE

KS

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SP4

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR VIRGIL ARTHUR MURRAY
POSTED ON 4.17.2021

Ground Casualty

SP4 Virgil A. Murray was an Ammunition Storage Specialist assigned to the 820th Ordinance Company, 184th Ordinance Battalion. On January 13, 1966, the 184th had just arrived in Vietnam two weeks before, and due to a delay in receiving its equipment, was still moving into its battalion headquarters at the United States Army Support Command, Qui Nhon, headquarters complex in Binh Dinh Province, RVN, to start functioning in the capacity of ammunition distribution. Two days later, Murray became ill and was admitted to the 85th Evacuation Hospital at Qui Nhon. He was medically evacuated to the 106th General Hospital at Kishine Barracks in Yokohama, Japan, and underwent surgery for a duodenal ulcer. Following his operation, he developed a high fever and was found to be suffering from septicemia. His condition deteriorated and he was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit where he died on March 17, 1966, from acute peritonitis. Murray's death raised suspicions of a surgical mistake. There were no autopsy facilities at Kishine Barracks, and since the findings of an autopsy could have serious implications for the surgeon or the surgical team, Murray was autopsied at another military base. The procedure was conducted at Johnson Air Station in Iruma, home of the U.S. 7th Field Hospital in Saitama prefecture just north of Tokyo, which had a facility that would meet the standards of a thorough forensic postmortem medical examination. The autopsy found evidence of a small opening in the sutured area around where the ulcer had been. This allowed seepage from the intestines into Murray’s peritoneum through the improperly closed incision, resulting in the peritonitis which precipitated a fatal heart attack, the cause of death listed in his casualty report. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and wetherall.org]
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POSTED ON 1.3.2021
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sp4 Virgil Murray, Thank you for your service as an Ammunition Specialist. The 55th anniversary of the start of your tour just passed. 55 years ago soon is when you became ill. sad. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is the 10th Day of Christmas, Merry Christmas & Happy New Year. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 3.14.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering an American Hero

Dear SP4 Virgil Arthur Murray, sir



As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.



May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say 'thank you'; for America, for those who love you, and for the Sgt's son.



With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir



Curt Carter (son of Sgt. Ardon William Carter, 101st Airborne, February 4, 1966, South Vietnam)


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POSTED ON 7.20.2011
POSTED BY: Robert Sage

We Remember

Virgil is buried at Evergreen Cemetery, Colorado Springs, El Paso County,CO.
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POSTED ON 4.2.2008
POSTED BY: Pamela Murray-Perez

I Wish

Dad,

I miss you. I wish you could see your grandkids. I often wondered as I grew what it would have been like to have had you here to talk to. I wish I could put my arms around you and give a big hug and tell you how much I love you.
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