THOMAS W BENNETT
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HONORED ON PANEL 32W, LINE 10 OF THE WALL

THOMAS WILLIAM BENNETT

WALL NAME

THOMAS W BENNETT

PANEL / LINE

32W/10

DATE OF BIRTH

04/07/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PLEIKU

DATE OF CASUALTY

02/11/1969

HOME OF RECORD

MORGANTOWN

COUNTY OF RECORD

Monongalia County

STATE

WV

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CPL

THIS NAME WILL BE READ AS PART OF THE READING OF THE NAMES ON

11/09/2022 at 8:36pm

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REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR THOMAS WILLIAM BENNETT
POSTED ON 12.31.2021
POSTED BY: Grateful Vietnam Vet

Medal of Honor Award

CITATION: The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Corporal Thomas William Bennett, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a platoon Medical aidman with 2d Platoon, Company B, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chu Pa, Pleiku Province, Republic of Vietnam, from 9 to 11 February 1969, during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. On 9 February the platoon was moving to assist the 1st Platoon of Company D which had run into a North Vietnamese ambush when it became heavily engaged by the intense small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and rocket fire from a well fortified and numerically superior enemy unit. In the initial barrage of fire, three of the point members of the platoon fell wounded. Corporal Bennett, with complete disregard for his safety, ran through the heavy fire to his fallen comrades, administered life-saving first aid under fire and then made repeated trips carrying the wounded men to positions of relative safety from which they would be medically evacuated from the battle position. Corporal Bennett repeatedly braved the intense enemy fire moving across open areas to give aid and comfort to his wounded comrades. He valiantly exposed himself to the heavy fire in order to retrieve the bodies of several fallen personnel. Throughout the night and following day, Corporal Bennett moved from position to position treating and comforting the several personnel who had suffered shrapnel and gunshot wounds. On 11 February, Company B again moved in an assault on the well fortified enemy positions and became heavily engaged with the numerically superior enemy force. Five members of the company fell wounded in the initial assault. Corporal Bennett ran to their aid without regard to the heavy fire. He treated one wounded comrade and began running toward another seriously wounded man. Although the wounded man was located forward of the company position covered by heavy enemy grazing fire and Corporal Bennett was warned that it was impossible to reach the position, he leaped forward with complete disregard for his safety to save his comrade's life. In attempting to save his fellow soldier, he was mortally wounded. (Continued)
See https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/3044
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POSTED ON 11.3.2021
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring a Medal of Honor recipient

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. Your Medal of Honor attests to your courage and devotion to your fellow soldiers. May you rest in eternal peace.
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POSTED ON 8.31.2021
POSTED BY: Lawrence F. Zandarski

Tommy, I regret we never had the chance to watch those football games, Pitt vs WVU.

We certainly had our opinions about those two teams. Glad we agree on the Steelers. I hope your community knows what a hero they have. I'll miss you.
Larry "Hondo" Zandarski Natrona PA.
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POSTED ON 11.6.2020
POSTED BY: Grayson

The Courage to Stand up For What You Believe

To the family of Thomas W. Bennett,

I was inspired by your son’s story because he was a conscientious objector. I also do not believe in killing others. He stood up for his beliefs. He cared about human life enough that he wouldn’t kill other people, so he became a medic to help them instead. My mom is a paramedic and she has a tough job. He did a very important job. He didn’t stop there though. He went above and beyond Because he also gave his life trying to save others. I hope that one day I will get to meet him in the resurrection. (John 5:28, 29; Rev. 21:4)
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POSTED ON 5.25.2020
POSTED BY: CPT Tim Richards

Need a Medic

Article in May 24, 2020 Orange County Register: 2nd conscientious objector to receive the Medal of Honor in Vietnam: "pulled 5 wounded men to safety on Feb 9, 1969. Then KIA Feb 11 by sniper while trying to rescue another wounded soldier." 58,220 killed in Vietnam. You are Remembered!
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