JAMES MUIR
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (14)
HONORED ON PANEL 63E, LINE 14 OF THE WALL

JAMES MUIR

WALL NAME

JAMES MUIR

PANEL / LINE

63E/14

DATE OF BIRTH

06/07/1942

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

05/19/1968

HOME OF RECORD

TUCSON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Pima County

STATE

AZ

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

1LT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JAMES MUIR
POSTED ON 5.30.2022
POSTED BY: Cynthia Carudo Ingersoll

Thinking of you Jimmy on Memorial Day

I was only 10 when my cousin Jimmy died in Vietnam. I have fond memories of you visiting us with brother John. My mother was your Aunt but you were only a few years apart. She loved you so very much. On the day we lost you I came home from school it was a dark rainy day and she was looking out the kitchen door crying and broken hearted. TY for your service.
read more read less
POSTED ON 12.23.2020
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Lt James Muir, Thank you for your service as an Infantry Officer. The 52nd anniversary of the star of your tour is soon. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is the Last Week of Advent, which is love. Christmas is soon, Merry Christmas. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
read more read less
POSTED ON 5.18.2016
POSTED BY: Rachel Fender Opinsky

In memory of my swim coach, Jim

I remember Lt. Muir as Jim, the best swim coach I ever had. He coached the Rolling Hills Tigers which I was a member of.
Although I was young, 10ish when began, I fondly remember how tough Coach was on me. He must have thought I was promising in swim. I have been to the Vietnam Memorial Wall twice & looked his name up each time. Tomorrow is the 48th year of his passing. He made such an impression on me & so I say, Thank you, Coach for believing in me and the other kids and thank you for your service. You are much loved!
read more read less
POSTED ON 4.29.2016
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear 1LT James Muir, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, Sir

Curt Carter
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.1.2016

The Last Day with a Hero - I would like to contact a family member

I was the Senior Corpsman of Delta 1/4 and the last Doc to treat Lt. Muir as he left the battlefield on April 26, 1968. What a wonderful man, a great leader, mentor, and friend. I think of him daily.

Semper Fi Lt. Muir

“The Forgotten Boys of Leatherneck Square”

There was a location in the Vietnam War; its name was Leatherneck Square,
and many a young boy died in that place, all with much despair.

To die so young, in this faraway place, is just such a shame,
their boyish faces, to many of us, will always remain the same.

Their sacrifice and memories we say, will continue to last and last,
but history will show, like so many before, that their life will fade to the past.

The forgotten boys, who gave their lives, were all in their primes,
knowing full well, that many back home, were accusing them of crimes.

I was a Doc, who treated the Marine, to keep him in the fight,
but the forgotten boys, continued to die, on both my left and right.

I treated so many, as they struggled for breath,
but for countless boys, there was still only death.

As a Marine went over, their families would brag,
praying their boys, would not come home draped in a flag.

My year was up, and home I came,
mostly intact, but never the same.

Back in the states, still dressed in greens,
I notify the families, of their dead Marines.

I observed many a mother, drop to their knees,
screaming at their Gods, who had ignored their pleas.

Four years of service, and now I was free,
but the boys were there, and only I could see.

I made a pledge to live life, the best I could,
to honor those boys, that just never would.

What’s a Doc do, but continue to treat,
I joined the paramedics, and served on the street.

I live every day, as if it were my last,
in respect for the boys, who’s lives passed too fast.

Often years later, I would awake with a dread,
wondering if I had done enough, to honor the dead.

Forty years it’s been, and I look back on my life,
spending all those years, with the same loving wife.

Three wonderful daughters, are now fully grown,
with so many delightful children, all of their own.

Forty-five years in the Fire Service, helping my fellow man,
and now my retirement, seems so well in hand.

How many boys, would have loved to be me,
instead of their life, spent under a tree.

Now sitting on my porch, in my rocking chair,
never to forget,
“The Forgotten Boys of Leatherneck Square”.

Semper Fi

HM2 “Doc” Larry Miller, Senior Corpsman, USMC, 1966 to 70

read more read less
1 2 3