STEVEN P MORSE
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HONORED ON PANEL 30E, LINE 64 OF THE WALL

STEVEN PAUL MORSE

WALL NAME

STEVEN P MORSE

PANEL / LINE

30E/64

DATE OF BIRTH

10/12/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BIEN HOA

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/22/1967

HOME OF RECORD

BRIDGETON

COUNTY OF RECORD

St. Louis County

STATE

MO

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR STEVEN PAUL MORSE
POSTED ON 12.14.2020
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Steven Morse, Thank you for your service as an Infantryman. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is 3rd Week of Advent, and this week means joy. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 5.3.2018

Air Loss Over Land

On November 22, 1967, a U.S. Army DeHavilland U-1A Otter (#57-6119) fixed-wing aircraft from the 54th Aviation Company crashed and burned on takeoff from runway east at Long Binh Army Airfield in Bien Hoa Province, RVN. The accident occurred as the Otter was leaving the airstrip when it hit a cable that was strung on a crane next to the runway. The pilot lost control of the plane and crashed. Personnel nearby heard the crash and came running, but the would-be rescuers had trouble approaching the wreck as it was totally engulfed. A total of nine U.S. personnel would die as a result of this accident. SP4 Thomas B. Allen, the crew chief on the flight, died in the crash along with passengers PVT Sheldon D. Bowler, PFC Marshall F. Freng, PFC Steven P. Morse, and PVT Allyson Y. Sasaki. Two other passengers, SP4 Woodrow D. Adler, a courier for Headquarters & Headquarters Company (HHC), 222nd Aviation Battalion, and PFC David L. Tasker, died four days later from burns they suffered in the accident. Military records regarding this incident listed two persons as the pilot of the aircraft. One of them, CW2 David A. Kreitzer, is the probable pilot as he served with the 54th Aviation Company and reportedly flew U-1 Otters during his first tour of Vietnam. Kreitzer succumbed on December 2, 1967, to burn injuries he suffered in the crash. The second pilot listed, MAJ Larry G. Powell, was a rotary wing (helicopter) pilot from the 45th Medical Company. Powell reportedly died after being evacuated to the U.S. Military burn unit at the 106th General Hospital in Yokohama, Japan. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org, vvmf.org, and thewall-usa.com, and information provided by Don Yaxley (May 2018)]
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POSTED ON 2.14.2017
POSTED BY: DeeDee Costa Edwards

Cousin

Although we've never met, I've been in touch with your dad, my Uncle a lot lately. I've thought of you often and just yesterday I spoke with your dad about you. He still misses you and will always love you, as will I.
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POSTED ON 6.16.2015

You were taken too soon..

The opportunity for me to ever have you in my life was taken from me. I am your eldest granddaughter. My name is Erica and I am twenty-two years old. Thinking of you and seeing your grave and your pictures makes me realize that part of me is missing. I may have never met you but I feel such a strong love for you. There are so many things I wish I could ask you. But most of all I wish I could have been lucky enough to have met you.
I love you grandpa.

Your granddaughter,
Erica Morse
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POSTED ON 11.1.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear PFC Steven Paul Morse, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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