FRANK E MOREY JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 31E, LINE 41 OF THE WALL

FRANK ERNEST MOREY JR

WALL NAME

FRANK E MOREY JR

PANEL / LINE

31E/41

DATE OF BIRTH

07/11/1935

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/05/1967

HOME OF RECORD

BRIMFIELD

COUNTY OF RECORD

Hampden County

STATE

MA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

GSGT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR FRANK ERNEST MOREY JR
POSTED ON 6.6.2023
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you....

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. As long as you are remembered you will always be with us….
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POSTED ON 5.6.2022
POSTED BY: Gore

Marine

Thanks. You were a good marine. Glad I served with you
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POSTED ON 12.3.2020
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Gysgt Frank Morey, Thank you for your service as an Intelligence Assistant. Your 53rd anniversary is in 2 days, sad. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. It is Advent, and this week means hope. Time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness, especially now. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 4.6.2018

Final Mission of GSGT Frank E. Morey Jr.

On December 4, 1967, a RU-6A Beaver aircraft from the 138th Aviation Company (Radio Research), located at Da Nang, RVN, took off for a routine, but highly classified mission. A total of four crew members were on board the aircraft at t crash. The Beaver left Da Nang Air Force Base at approximately 1225 hours and departed southwest to their operational area. Since the mission this aircraft was conducting was secret, its objectives were unknown except that it required orbiting particular areas of an assigned sector. Initially, the aircraft was flown over relatively flat coastal terrain. However, after approximately fifteen to twenty minutes, the nature of the terrain changed abruptly to mountains interspersed with steep canyon waIls and one major river valley known as the Song Vu Gia River. Sometime between 1400 and 1430 hours, the aircraft was in the process of making a series of turns at low elevation in mountainous terrain when it struck trees and the ground. Prior to impact with the ground, the aircraft penetrated dense jungle vegetation consisting of thick bamboo, brush, and scattered hard wood trees. The trees were estimated to be approximately forty to fifty feet high and extremely dense. The impact with these trees severed the left wing from the remainder of the fuselage and further caused the aircraft to either spin or cartwheel in such a manner that it came to rest 180 degrees from its flight path. The right wing was partially under the fuselage and the passenger compartment was buckled. The pilot, CPT Douglas J. Kelly, and one operator, WO1 Robert D. King, were killed as a result of the crash. Two crew members survived, and after considerable difficulty and delay caused by deteriorating weather and inability to locate the wreckage, were rescued after being lifted out in a basket lowered by a hovering USAF HH-3 Jolly Green Giant helicopter from the 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron. The extraction of the two survivors was completed at 1700 hours, and they were immediately flown to the Navy Hospital at Da Nang. The two fatalities were extracted by a second rescue helicopter with the assistance of Special Forces personnel at 1750 hours. Attempts the following day to extract classified information from the wreckage resulted in one crew member from the 37th Aerospace Rescue Squadron (Jolly Green Giant) being wounded by enemy small arms fire. In addition, two Marine UH-1E armed helicopters gunships were lost and four crew members killed when they inadvertently flew into a mountain while attempting to return to Da Nang IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) after this mission was aborted due to poor weather. All four crewmembers in the lead aircraft were killed, while the crew of the second aircraft survived. The second aircraft was able to see lead helicopter impact and explode. The second aircraft executed a pull up, impacted the top of trees, tumbled over several times, and came to rest inverted on the ground. The co-pilot and gunner were injured during the impact. The surviving crew was on the ground for three and a half hours until rescue aircraft arrived to pull them out. During the extensive time on ground, the second crew determined that no one survived the impact and burning of the lead helicopter. The aircraft was completely incinerated. The lost Marine crew included aircraft commander 2LT Robert I. Terry III, pilot CPT Gary L. England, and crewmen CPL August H. Monhof and GSGT Frank E. Morey Jr. The first rescue aircraft on the scene was supposed to be picking up a VIP at Da Nang when it was diverted to the crash site. They found the mountain in clouds and located the survivors by tuning in to the ADF (automatic direction finder). They picked up the co-pilot and gunner, the two most severely injured. Crew members provided first aid to the two injured Marines. The co-pilot had suffered serious injuries to his face along with internal injuries. It appeared he hit the instrument panel or the cyclic stick on impact. Rescue breathes had to be administered mouth to mouth when he stopped breathing. The gunner had a broken hip and some other internal injuries. Both would survive. During the 20-minute flight the fuel light was on an extended time. The rescue ship ran out of fuel landing at Marble Mountain airfield and had to be towed off runway. [Taken from popasmoke.org and 138thavnco.org]
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POSTED ON 7.11.2016
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Gunnery Sergeant Frank Ernest Morey Jr., Served with Marine Observation Squadron 2 (VMO-2), Marine Aircraft Group 16 (MAG-16), 1st Marine Aircraft Wing (1st MAW).
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