FRED G MICK
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HONORED ON PANEL 1W, LINE 81 OF THE WALL

FRED GEORGE MICK

WALL NAME

FRED G MICK

PANEL / LINE

1W/81

DATE OF BIRTH

07/14/1946

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BIEN HOA

DATE OF CASUALTY

10/12/1972

HOME OF RECORD

REYNOLDSBURG

COUNTY OF RECORD

Franklin County

STATE

OH

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SGT

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR FRED GEORGE MICK
POSTED ON 4.16.2015
POSTED BY: Steve Walton

Sgt. Fred Mick a true friend and comrade.

Fred and I were in Special Forces training and did many things together along with Dave. We received our green berets together and we both started medic training together. He loved his family and I still have the picture of his daughter that he gave me at that time. I often wish that I would have stayed in Special Forces with Fred but I made a different choice and ended up in Vietnam with the 101st. If I had stayed maybe I would have been with him and would have been able to help him. I have learned that God is in control of those things. I do know that I lost a dear friend. Rest in Peace Brother.
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POSTED ON 8.5.2014

SGT Fred Mick and Long Hai FANK Training Command

I was the security NCO for two security companies at Camp Long Hai training battalion, Vietnam in 1972. I do not remember the date but was their when a SF team from Okinawa 1st SFG arrived at our camp along with about 50+ Cambodian Officers. After a few weeks went by, I was assigned to be in a convoy that would transport those Cambodian officers back to their country. Early in the morning that day as we were putting together the vehicle order, my CO, Col. Matthews approached me as told me that I was not going, instead he asked me to teach a class on the 50 caliber class, and that the senior MSGT from the Okinawan 1st SFG team requested they lead the convoy. And that is what happen, a few hours into the morning while I was teaching the class, I heard coded chatter over the radio that the convoy was hit with heavy Cambodian causalities, several wounded US, and one U.S K.I.A. I am ashamed to say, I never had the opportunity to meet SGT Fred Mick and to be honest, I did not know that was his name. I wonder if anyone would help me find his family. I would like to share more personal information. Also, a few month before this incident, we lost SGT Lawling, he was the security NCO for camp Phouc Tuy, a few miles down the road from our camp. May their memories never be forgotten.
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POSTED ON 10.21.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter

Remembering An American Hero

Dear SGT Fred George Mick, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 11.9.2005
POSTED BY: Bob Ross

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.
I am not there; I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow,
I am the diamond glints on snow,
I am the sun on ripened grain,
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry,
I am not there; I did not die.

Mary Frye – 1932

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POSTED ON 2.9.2004

I served with Fred Mick and John Stanford

While John and Mick were operating, Doc Ostrich, me and Danny Tizen were at the other table cutting off the leg of the Cambodian Soldier, who stepped on the mine that had wounded their patient.
Later on, I joined them at the table and finally met Fred for the first time. Afterwards, I remembered, it was the only time I ever talked to him during the time he was at Long Hai.
The next morning, we had to go back into the same mine field and get an American who minutes earlier, stepped on another toe popper. SSG Ryan and me were going through the mine field to get him. The grass was about a foot high and it was windy. Attempting to get out of our way, a Chinese Nung, took one step too many, and stepped on another toe popper. I took care of him and carried him out. The Nung lost his foot up to boot top and the American lost only half of his foot.
I overslept and missed the convoy in which SGT Mick was killed along with as many as fifeteen dead and wounded Cambodians. One other American was slightly wounded

John e-mail me.
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