BOBBY BAXLEY
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HONORED ON PANEL 17W, LINE 80 OF THE WALL

BOBBY BAXLEY

WALL NAME

BOBBY BAXLEY

PANEL / LINE

17W/80

DATE OF BIRTH

12/01/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG TRI

DATE OF CASUALTY

10/15/1969

HOME OF RECORD

FAYETTEVILLE

COUNTY OF RECORD

Cumberland County

STATE

NC

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR BOBBY BAXLEY
POSTED ON 4.22.2010

Photo

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POSTED ON 10.16.2008
POSTED BY: Arnold M. Huskins

The Fayetteville Observer article

Hope Mills soldier served 'proudly and honorably'

By Jim Petit
The Fayetteville Observer
15 October 2008

Bobby Baxley knew what he wanted in life.

He already had part of the dream, his wife Mary, his sweetheart since the 10th grade. He was working at Black & Decker, but had had a forestry degree from Wayne Tech and was planning a career in the forest service.

Married less than four months, his civilian life went on hold when he was drafted into the Army on March 3, 1969.

On Oct. 15, 1969, Pfc. Bobby Baxley’s life ended during a mortar attack in Quang Tri province in South Vietnam. He left his foxhole to make room for two fellow soldiers. He was 21.

His courage and sacrifice for Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 11th Infantry Regiment, 5th Infantry Division earned a Bronze Star and immortality on the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington: Panel 17W, Line 080.

Baxley was born in Robeson County, but grew up in Fayetteville. He was a graduate of Hope Mills High School.

“I think it was almost love at first sight,” Mary Baxley recalled. “We did part company for a little while — about a month — and then we got back together and that was it. I think we actually met on a school bus.”

Baxley was an avid hunter and fisherman. Trips on the water with his brother, Elmer, and father, Milton, were always special, as were days afield with Queenie, his beloved pointer. Squirrel and deer were his favorite hunts, but any day in the woods was a good one. Mary often accompanied him, the best of both worlds.

His closest friends were Mickey Turlington and Jimmy Culbreth, but the circle was a wide one. “Everybody liked him because he was just such a nice person and a fine person,” Mary said.

Baxley collected rocks and liked beach music. He and Mary had a favorite song, Ronnie Dove’s “Right or Wrong.” He had a passion for Pontiac GTOs. His sister, Ann, drove one.

He liked all kinds of foods. “Fried chicken, of course,” Mary said, “because he was a typical Southern boy, but he especially loved his sister-in-law’s German chocolate cake. The sister-in-law, Elaine Baxley, was more like a blood sister. They could talk about anything.

“He was doing what he had to do,” Mary said of her husband’s military service. “He served his country proudly and honorably. I don’t think he would undo it even though he had a premonition and told his brother that he wouldn’t make it back.”

The last time Mary saw Bobby was at Raleigh-Durham Airport where she and Elmer Baxley drove him there to catch a flight to California where he would join his unit and depart for Vietnam.

She didn’t share her husband’s premonition, but there was a later sense of foreboding.

Mary was visiting an aunt and uncle in Winston-Salem when, on a Wednesday, she suddenly felt an overwhelming need to get back to Fayetteville.

“I told them I just had to go home,” she said.

It was the day Bobby Baxley was killed.

Army notification came four days later.

Mary, family and friends were devastated.

“He was my first serious love,” Mary said. “You don’t ever forget that.”

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POSTED ON 9.13.2006
POSTED BY: Bill Nelson

NEVER FORGOTTEN

FOREVER REMEMBERED

"If you are able, save for them a place inside of you....and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go.....Be not ashamed to say you loved them....
Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own....And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind...."

Quote from a letter home by Maj. Michael Davis O'Donnell
KIA 24 March 1970. Distinguished Flying Cross: Shot down and Killed while attempting to rescue 8 fellow soldiers surrounded by attacking enemy forces.

We Nam Brothers pause to give a backward glance, and post this remembrance to you , one of the gentle heroes and patriots lost to the War in Vietnam:

Slip off that pack. Set it down by the crooked trail. Drop your steel pot alongside. Shed those magazine-ladened bandoliers away from your sweat-soaked shirt. Lay that silent weapon down and step out of the heat. Feel the soothing cool breeze right down to your soul ... and rest forever in the shade of our love, brother.

From your Nam-Band-Of-Brothers
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POSTED ON 10.22.2003
POSTED BY: Sammy Henderson

Thank You

My name is Sammy Henderson and I live in Gridley, Illinois. I go to Gridley High School and for a school project I am posting remembrances. God bless you! You gave your life for our country. Who knows how our world would be different if you had not given your life. Thank you so much!
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POSTED ON 10.16.2002
POSTED BY: KATHIE WILKINS-DICKENS

REMEMBERING A FRIEND

I can't believe that over 30 years has gone by since your death. We were in school together---1st grade to high school. Growing up in Cumberland, NC, everyone knew everyone. You're missed by so many!
Kathie Wilkins-Dickens
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