GLENN E KOLLMANN
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HONORED ON PANEL 44E, LINE 27 OF THE WALL

GLENN EDWARD KOLLMANN

WALL NAME

GLENN E KOLLMANN

PANEL / LINE

44E/27

DATE OF BIRTH

12/22/1928

CASUALTY PROVINCE

NZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

03/12/1968

HOME OF RECORD

DALY CITY

COUNTY OF RECORD

San Mateo County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

NAVY

RANK

CDR

Book a time
Contact Details
STATUS

MIA

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR GLENN EDWARD KOLLMANN
POSTED ON 12.16.2021
POSTED BY: ANON

POW-MIA

Never forget.

Semper Fortis
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POSTED ON 1.14.2020
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Cdr Glenn Kollmann, Thank you for your service as an Unrestricted Line Officer o the USS ENTERPRISE. You are still MIA. Please come home. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Happy New Year in heaven. The time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 3.13.2019
POSTED BY: Janice Current

An American Hero

Thank you for your service and your sacrifice. Thank you for stepping up and answering your country's call. Rest easy knowing you will never be forgotten.
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POSTED ON 3.12.2017
POSTED BY: A Grateful Vietnam Veteran

Navy Cross

Glenn Edward Kollmann
Date of birth: 22-Dec-28
Date of death: 12-Mar-68
Home of record: Daly City California
Status: MIA

Both John Griffith and his Bombardier/Navigator, Lieutenant Commander John Griffith, received the Navy Cross for this mission. On March 12, 1968, Glenn Kollmann's aircraft malfunctioned during a night catapult launch, and ditched from its carrier. He and Lieutenant Commander Griffith were listed as Missing in Action, and neither man's remains have never been recovered.
AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Navy Cross


Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Commander Glenn Edward Kollmann (NSN: 0-551276), United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in aerial flight on 24 February 1968 as the Commanding Officer of Attack Squadron THIRTY-FIVE (VA-35), embarked in U.S.S. ENTERPRISE (CVA(N)-65). Commander Kollmann planned and led a night air strike against a vital and heavily defended port facility in the heart of North Vietnam. Piloting his aircraft at perilously low altitudes in the monsoon weather, he successfully penetrated intense and accurate enemy defenses. Disregarding the threatening surface-to-air missiles and the anti-aircraft artillery defending the target area, Commander Kollmann maintained a smooth, level flight path until bomb release, thereby ensuring an optimum bombing solution. Because of his daring and highly professional flying skill, his bombs found their mark, inflicting heavy damage upon the port facilities. By his airmanship, courage, and loyal devotion to duty in the face of intense hostile fire, Commander Kollmann contributed materially to United States efforts in Southeast Asia and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

General Orders: Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals

Action Date: 24-Feb-68

Service: Navy

Rank: Commander

Company: Attack Squadron 35 (VA-35)

Division: U.S.S. Enterprise (CVA(N)-65)
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POSTED ON 10.31.2015

Final Mission of CDR Glenn E. Kollmann

CDR Glenn E. Kollmann was an A-6A pilot and the commanding officer of VA 35. He was very popular in the squadron and regarded as a capable man with a wealth of aviation experience. On March 12, 1968, he was lost to malfunction, not an enemy missile. He and his bombardier navigator, LT John G. Griffith, launched from the carrier USS Enterprise. The weather was terrible, but perfect for A-6 missions. There were four planes launched for a mission over North Vietnam. On the catapult launch, squadron mates listened by radio as a malfunction caused Kollmann's aircraft to ditch right off the catapult. The other aircraft continued on their mission and onboard search and rescue tried to recover the downed crew. Kollmann and Griffith were never located, due to a large degree to the weather conditions. The two were listed as killed, and because their bodies were never found, they are listed among the missing in Southeast Asia. [Taken from pownetwork.org]
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