DUNCAN E BASS JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 12E, LINE 84 OF THE WALL

DUNCAN EDWARD BASS JR

WALL NAME

DUNCAN E BASS JR

PANEL / LINE

12E/84

DATE OF BIRTH

06/04/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/18/1966

HOME OF RECORD

LIVE OAK

COUNTY OF RECORD

Suwannee County

STATE

FL

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

SGT

Book a time
Contact Details
ASSOCIATED ITEMS LEFT AT THE WALL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DUNCAN EDWARD BASS JR
POSTED ON 5.15.2022
POSTED BY: ANON

78

Never forgotten.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 6.5.2021
POSTED BY: john fabris

honoring you...

Thank you for your service to our country so long ago sir. May you rest in eternal peace.
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POSTED ON 6.4.2021
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Sergeant Duncan Edward Bass Jr., Served with the Reconnaissance Platoon, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 12.14.2016
POSTED BY: Lucy Conte Micik

Remembered

DEAR SERGEANT BASS,
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AS A GRUNT. WATCH OVER THE U.S.A., IT STILL NEEDS YOUR COURAGE. ADVENT IS HERE, AND CHRISTMAS IS APPROACHING. WE ARE THANKFUL FOR YOU. THE NEW YEAR IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER, WHICH MAKES IT FAR TOO LONG FOR YOU TO HAVE BEEN GONE. GOD BLESS YOU. MAY THE SAINTS AND ANGELS BE AT YOUR SIDE. REST IN PEACE.
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POSTED ON 11.15.2016

Final Mission of SGT Duncan E. Bass Jr.

On November 17, 1966, Brigadier General James F. Hollingsworth, assistant division commander of the First Infantry Division, was flying in his C&C (Command and Control) UH-1 helicopter low over the jungle in the vicinity of Phu Loi, Tay Ninh Province, when his aircraft was fired on from below. Incensed, BG Hollingsworth reported this probable enemy position, and the next morning Reconnaissance Platoon of 1st Battalion, 18th Regiment, was sent out to engage the offending party. The 22-member patrol departed their base camp at 0900 hours with the sun blazing down and the temperature passing the 100 degree mark. After three hours of moving single-file through thick jungle vegetation, they came to a clearing. Sensing danger, point man PFC James S. Gilbert changed direction to stay within the tree line. After advancing only a dozen strides, a burst of automatic fire from an undetected enemy position at the far side of the clearing hit PFC Gilbert. He crumpled without a sound. The bullets had hit him in the right side and back. He died the next day. Ten meters behind him was a pile of logs that men of the forward rifle squad were crossing when the gunfire erupted. SGT Duncan E. Bass Jr. was at that moment atop the pile and scrambling for the far side when a rifle grenade exploded against the chamber of his M-16 rifle. Fragments from the blast shredded his face and chest. The blow knocked him down from the pile, flattening him. He was able to regain his feet and scream, then pitched forward headfirst, dead. Nearby, 1LT Frederick P. Victoria was felled by bullets. A medic crawled to him and administered mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Victoria regained consciousness, opened his eyes and spoke, complaining of difficulty breathing. He passed out again, then opened his eyes once more, this time ordering the machine gun to move up. After this he did not speak again and his body slackened. His heart continued to beat strongly for several minutes. The medic radioed the battalion surgeon, asking what could be done for Victoria. He continued to apply heart massage and more mouth-to-mouth for another 10-15 minutes before another soldier pulled him off when it was clear the lieutenant had expired. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and the book “Ambush” by S.L.A. Marshall]
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