WILLIAM E KENNEDY
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HONORED ON PANEL 12E, LINE 102 OF THE WALL

WILLIAM EDWARD KENNEDY

WALL NAME

WILLIAM E KENNEDY

PANEL / LINE

12E/102

DATE OF BIRTH

12/20/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

PR & MR UNKNOWN

DATE OF CASUALTY

11/21/1966

HOME OF RECORD

LOS ANGELES

COUNTY OF RECORD

Los Angeles County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

CPL

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Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR WILLIAM EDWARD KENNEDY
POSTED ON 2.12.2023
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

Say not in grief he is no more, but live in thankfulness that he was.
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POSTED ON 1.5.2021

Final Mission of PFC William E. Kennedy

Blackhorse Base Camp was established in late October 1966 as the base camp for the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. The camp was located on highway QL-2, eight miles southwest of Xuan Loc in in Long Khanh Province, RVN. During its construction, numerous convoys brought troops and materiel from Long Binh Post. Each convoy presented a target and an opportunity to the enemy. On the mid-morning of November 21, 1966, a large convoy containing eighty vehicles escorted by a platoon-sized armored cavalry unit from C Troop, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry, made up of nine M113 ACAVs (Armored Cavalry Assault Vehicles), departed from Long Binh. When less than twelve miles from Xuan Loc, the convoy was warned that a Viet Cong force might be nearby. At approximately 10:25 AM, the lead ACAV began to receive small arms and automatic weapons fire. Much of the convoy, about half, passed through the kill zone as fast as possible, with the lead and command ACAV’s returning to the ambush area with all guns firing. The enemy fire scored hits on several vehicles, bringing the remainder of the convoy to a halt, and turning the American vehicles into sitting targets. By this time enemy fire was coming from both sides of the road. The enemy force, estimated at 500-1000 men, stepped up the attack, using mortars and recoilless rifles, as the Americans returned fire at a rapid rate. Five minutes after the first shots had been fired, two armed helicopters were providing fire support followed by air strikes from fixed-wing aircraft. The air support and the aggressive response from the ACAVs forced the Viet Cong to break off contact. The Americans confirmed thirty enemy soldiers dead and estimated another seventy-five to one hundred killed. Seven U.S. soldiers lost their lives to Viet Cong fire, which also destroyed two ACAVs and four trucks. The 11th Armored Cav lost PFC Russell L. Halley (awarded the Bronze Star for heroism), SP4 Ray E. Johnson, SP4 Wallace J. Malone, PFC Harry L. Powers (awarded the Bronze Star for heroism), and SP4 Jimmy L. Rhodes (awarded the Silver Star for heroism). The 87th Transportation Company (Light Truck) lost two killed instantly by a recoilless rifle or mortar round, PFC William E. Kennedy (posthumously promoted to Corporal) and PFC Dennis R. Lehman; three others from the unit were wounded. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “Armor Goes to War” by John M. Carland, Army History, Spring 2016]
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POSTED ON 11.25.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Cpl William Kennedy, Thank you for your service as an Aircraft Maintenance Apprentice. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Thanksgiving is in a few days, so this is the perfect time to say thanks. The time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 12.20.2017
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Corporal William Edward Kennedy, Served with the 87th Transportation Company, 6th Transportation Battalion, 48th Transportation Group, United States Army Support Command (Saigon), 1st Logistical Command, United States Army Vietnam.
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POSTED ON 8.23.2016

Final Mission of PFC William E. Kennedy

PFC Dennis R. Lehman was a light truck driver and PFC William E. Kennedy was an aircraft maintenance apprentice. Both soldiers were assigned to the 87th Transportation Company. On November 21, 1966, the 87th sustained its first combat casualties since its deployment to Vietnam. As part of a convoy from Xuan Loc, RVN, on a direct support mission for the 11th Cavalry Regiment, they were ambushed by the Viet Cong. PFC Kennedy and PFC Lehman were killed instantly when the vehicle they were traveling in was hit by a recoilless rifle round. SGT Ramon Melendez-Diaz, SP4 Earl M. Sneed, and PFC Craig E. Pfender were wounded in action. PFC’s Kennedy and Lehman were promoted in rank and awarded the Purple Heart posthumously. The three wounded also received Purple Hearts and SP4 Sneed was also awarded the Bronze Star with a “V” device for bravery while under fire. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and transportation.army.mil]
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