PAUL J KAPPMEYER
VIEW ALL PHOTOS (2)
HONORED ON PANEL 10E, LINE 21 OF THE WALL

PAUL JOSEPH KAPPMEYER

WALL NAME

PAUL J KAPPMEYER

PANEL / LINE

10E/21

DATE OF BIRTH

08/13/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

08/20/1966

HOME OF RECORD

INDIANAPOLIS

STATE

IN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

SGT

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR PAUL JOSEPH KAPPMEYER
POSTED ON 6.27.2021
POSTED BY: Raymond R. Brown

HONOR restored

I stopped by your Grave Marker today, as a two-tour Vietnam Veteran, you are my Brother. I cleaned and restored Honor to your Marker as it should be. A Flag was placed, TAPS were played, and a Slow Hand Salute rendered. RIP my Brother, may you never be Forgotten.
read more read less
POSTED ON 11.3.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Sgt Paul Kappmeyer, Thank you for your service as a Rifleman. Saying thank you isn't enough, but it is from the heart. Election Day is in 2 days. The time passes quickly. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
read more read less
POSTED ON 10.24.2016
POSTED BY: gary slapnicker

gary slapnicker

kapp i will always remember you as my very good friend. remember the time we got a ride in to da nang so we could see a priest to hear our confession
and how some of the guys would get our names mixed up and call me kappnicker and you slapmeyer
I think of you offten
gary
read more read less
POSTED ON 8.20.2014
POSTED BY: A Marine, USMC, Vietnam

Silver Star Citation

Paul Joseph Kappmeyer
Date of death: KIA
Home of record: Indianapolis Indiana
Status: KIA

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Silver Star

Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Paul Joseph Kappmeyer (MCSN: 2013858), United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company M, Third Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, on 20 August 1966. While serving as Platoon Guide with the First Platoon, Company M, Sergeant Kappmeyer was engaged in a sweep and destroy mission in the vicinity of An Hoa, Republic of Vietnam. With a section of tanks, the first platoon was leading the company advance when suddenly they came under a vicious volume of small arms, automatic weapons and anti-tank fire from a well entrenched and concealed company of Viet Cong Insurgents. Upon receiving the enemy fire, the First Platoon deployed and on order of the Platoon Commander, fixed bayonets and assaulted the enemy positions. Sergeant Kappmeyer during the assault was in a position to the rear of the platoon commander. As the assault approached the entrenched Viet Cong, Sergeant Kappmeyer observed that his platoon commander had been hit by enemy fire. Without hesitation he advanced to his platoon leader's side and administered first aid. Then observing another Marine being hit and lying fully exposed to the still intense enemy fire, Sergeant Kappmeyer with full knowledge of the hazards involved and with complete disregard for his own safety, moved to assist the fallen Marine. As he was pulling the fallen Marine to a position of cover he was mortally wounded by a burst of automatic small arms fire. As a result of his extraordinary initiative and inspiring valor Sergeant Kappmeyer saved the life of his fellow Marine although giving his own. By his daring actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk, Sergeant Kappmeyer upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Action Date: August 20, 1966

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Sergeant

Company: Company M

Battalion: 3d Battalion

Regiment: 9th Marines

Division: 3d Marine Division (Rein.), FMF
read more read less
POSTED ON 3.20.2014
POSTED BY: R.Parks

You still live on in our memories

Paul: You and my brother Frank Parks of C/1/5 were very close friends.I doubt I'll ever forget when you & my brother came home on leave in the fall of 1965 & you two spent a few days with us down at our fishing camp just kicking back laughing and relaxing before heading back to your parents house in Indianapolis. I was a young kid but I remember you well. Your death profoundly changed my brother Frank forever. I doubt a day goes by that you are not in his thoughts and a tear comes to his eye. He has said on many somber occasions he would give anything he has to just set down with you and see you one more time . My brother use to go over and visit your parents but I guess it was just to painful as it has been many years since he last visited even though he lives in Plainfield, Frank came home, grew old, became a Father of two Sons & a Daughter and now a Grandfather while you were denied those wonderful experiences by that brutal war. You would be happy and proud to know that times and our country have changed. The hair heads lost and for all their protests and rhetoric to change the world they changed practically nothing and once again Americans fly our flag with pride and respect and appreciate the service anyone who 1puts on a uniform & swears the oath to defend our country. These days you would get a handshake, a smile and a thank you for your service instead of a sneer or nasty comment. Rest easy Paul for you are still greatly loved and missed by those who met and knew you and you still live on as a smiling young brave Marine in peoples memories. It has been many years since I saw or talked to Frank but I will try to find a way to get him the web link to your memorial page on this web site so he can visit you. Semper Fi for all time in every clime and place.
read more read less
1 2 3