DONALD R HOSKINS
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HONORED ON PANEL 1W, LINE 7 OF THE WALL

DONALD RUSSELL HOSKINS

WALL NAME

DONALD R HOSKINS

PANEL / LINE

1W/7

DATE OF BIRTH

01/05/1929

CASUALTY PROVINCE

BINH LONG

DATE OF CASUALTY

04/26/1972

HOME OF RECORD

MADISON

COUNTY OF RECORD

Jefferson County

STATE

IN

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

TSGT

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR DONALD RUSSELL HOSKINS
POSTED ON 7.18.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Tsgt Donald Hoskins, Thank you for your service as a Fixed Wing Crewman with the 374th Tactical Airlift Wing. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 1.5.2017
POSTED BY: Dennis Wriston

I'm proud of our Vietnam Veterans

Technical Sergeant Donald Russell Hoskins, Served with the 345th Tactical Airlift Squadron, 374th Tactical Airlift Wing, 13th Air Force.
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POSTED ON 11.12.2016
POSTED BY: Smsgt Ronald O pasonen

fellow flight engineer

A fellow C-133 flight engineer, and a friend. Rest in peace Don. Smsgt Ronald O Pasonen
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POSTED ON 5.21.2014

Final Mission of TSGT Donald R. Hoskins

From the CCK Air Force Base in Taiwan, C-130 crews flew to different locations, including Korea, Borneo, Indonesia, Japan, Africa, etc. But most trips were to various bases in Vietnam for 3 week stays. Then the men would return to the base in Taiwan for 3 days. On one such Vietnam tour, one C-130E had a crew consisting of MAJ Harry A. Amesbury Jr., pilot; 1LT Richard L. Russell, navigator, TSGT Richard E. Dunn, loadmaster, SSGT Calvin C. Cooke Jr., TSGT Donald R. Hoskins, and CAPT Kurt F. Weisman, crew members. This crew was TDY to 345th Tactical Airlift Squadron at Tan Son Nhut Airbase, South Vietnam. On April 26, 1972, Amesbury's aircraft and crew were making a night drop of supplies to South Vietnamese forces trapped in An Loc, South Vietnam (about 65 miles from Saigon). The provincial capital had been under siege by North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces off and on since early April. Supply drops and air support were critically needed and often hampered by hostile forces outside the city. Supply drops were generally accomplished in one of two ways, both requiring that the plane be airborne, and flying at very low altitudes. Using one method, parachutes attached to the supply pallets were deployed. As the plane flew over, the parachutes pulled the cargo from the plane. Using another method, a hook attached to the cargo was dropped from the plane, affixed to some firm fixture on the ground. As the plane departed the area, the cargo was pulled out of the plane. Both required considerable skill under the best of circumstances. Upon approach to the drop site at a very low level, Amesbury's aircraft was hit by enemy fire and was reported to be down. The men onboard the aircraft were declared Missing in Action. According to the Department of the Air Force, it received unspecified information that contained evidence of death for the crew members on May 5, 1972. The status of the missing men was changed to Killed in Action/Body Not Recovered. In February, 1975, non-American friendly forces recovered and returned the remains of Kurt Weisman. No information surfaced on the rest of the crew. All onboard had been assumed killed in the downing of the plane. (Image: A U.S. Air Force Lockheed C-130B/E Hercules aircraft passes low over a drop zone in South Vietnam to deliver a pallet of supplies to ground forces in a forward area. The low altitude parachute extraction system (LAPES) was successfully used to resupply forward area sites where it was impossible for an aircraft to land.) [Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.com]
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POSTED ON 4.26.2013

Remembering an American Hero

Dear TSGT Donald Russell Hoskins, sir



As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.



May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say 'thank you'; for America, and for those who love you.



With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir



Curt Carter


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