THOMAS L HERRING
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HONORED ON PANEL 31E, LINE 24 OF THE WALL

THOMAS LEANDRA HERRING

WALL NAME

THOMAS L HERRING

PANEL / LINE

31E/24

DATE OF BIRTH

12/13/1947

CASUALTY PROVINCE

KONTUM

DATE OF CASUALTY

12/02/1967

HOME OF RECORD

RICHMOND

COUNTY OF RECORD

City Of Richmond

STATE

VA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

ARMY

RANK

PFC

Book a time
Contact Details

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR THOMAS LEANDRA HERRING
POSTED ON 12.13.2023
POSTED BY: ANON

76

Your sacrifice is not forgotten.

HOOAH
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POSTED ON 12.27.2022
POSTED BY: John Fabris

honoring you...

A butterfly lights beside us like a sunbeam
And for a brief moment its glory
and beauty belong to our world
But then it flies again
And though we wish it could have stayed...
We feel lucky to have seen it.
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POSTED ON 12.13.2021
POSTED BY: Donna Moore

Happy Heavenly Birthday

You will forever remain in our hearts and prayers
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POSTED ON 5.23.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear PFC Thomas Herring, I hope your photo is put here because yours is missing. Thank you for our service as an Infantryman. It is Memorial Day weekend when we honor you. Please watch over the USA, it still needs your courage. Rest in peace with the angels....
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POSTED ON 11.11.2018

Final Mission of PFC Thomas L. Herring

In late November 1967, Alpha Company, 3rd Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division began a patrol in the triple-canopy jungle west of Dak To in Kontum Province, RVN, near the border junctions of South Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. The patrol consisted of 114 men in four platoons and sixteen squads. They marched off firebase where the Battalion Commander was directing operations. Alpha Company had been in the field for 10 days, humping the jungle for 8-10 hours per day when it received orders to take Hill 943, a nearby mountain where suspected North Vietnamese Army elements were located. After getting in position, a fifteen-minute fire prep provided by the firebase’s artillery battery preceded Alpha Company’s march up Hill 943. The enemy presence on the mountain was soon confirmed when an elaborate bunker system was located. A search of the underground fortifications found it had been recently abandoned. Shortly after, Alpha blew a landing zone in the jungle so they could be resupplied, then set up a night defensive perimeter where it would pass the night. The following morning, December 2nd, the Company continued its advance through the thick jungle up Hill 943. An enemy command post was found, also abandoned. Its discovery prompted the Battalion Commander to fly out and inspect it personally. As Alpha continued heading up the mountain, a reconnaissance squad on the point position came under fire from some NVA soldiers. Two of the point men were wounded. An airstrike was called in on the enemy positions. As Alpha pulled back with their wounded, U.S. Air Force jets dropped 500 lb. bombs. One of the bombs exploded in the trees overhead, sending shrapnel nearby. In what was considered a freak accident, one of the fragments hit Alpha infantryman PFC Thomas L. Herring in the head, fatally injuring him. A medivac was requested, and Herring and the two wounded were lifted off the mountain. Alpha continued its assault of Hill 943 which was accomplished with no further enemy resistance. They abandoned the hill shortly thereafter, and it soon returned to enemy control. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and “Hill 943,” CBS News, 1968]
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