JAMES W HERRICK JR
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HONORED ON PANEL 17W, LINE 124 OF THE WALL

JAMES WAYNE HERRICK JR

WALL NAME

JAMES W HERRICK JR

PANEL / LINE

17W/124

DATE OF BIRTH

10/28/1944

CASUALTY PROVINCE

LZ

DATE OF CASUALTY

10/27/1969

HOME OF RECORD

PANORA

COUNTY OF RECORD

Guthrie County

STATE

IA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

AIR FORCE

RANK

CAPT

STATUS

MIA

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR JAMES WAYNE HERRICK JR
POSTED ON 8.3.2021
POSTED BY: Jim Herrick

Thanks!

It's awesome to see these comments full of thoughts and wishes related to my Uncle Jim and the family. Please visit our online memorial at firefly33 dot com if you would like to read letters submitted about Jim.
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POSTED ON 1.25.2021
POSTED BY: Marianne Blitsch

Bracelet

I wore his bracelet. Still have it. Would love to find a family member to give it to.
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POSTED ON 10.10.2020
POSTED BY: Patti Rankin

MIA Bracelet

I got my MIA bracelet in early ‘70’s. I wore it when I got married in ‘82. I still remember the date James went missing. If I can find the bracelet, I would love to give bracelet to the family.
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POSTED ON 10.10.2020
POSTED BY: Patti Rankin

MIA Bracelet

I got my MIA bracelet in early ‘70’s. I wore it when I got married in ‘82. I still remember the date James went missing. If I can find the bracelet, I would love to give bracelet to the family.
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POSTED ON 1.7.2020

Final Mission of 1LT James W. Herrick Jr.

1LT James W. Herrick Jr. was a U.S. Air Force pilot serving with 602nd Special Operations Squadron, 56th Special Operations Wing, 7th Air Force. On October 27, 1969, 1LT Herrick was piloting a USAF Douglas A-1H Skyraider (#52-137539), call sign Firefly 33. He was number two in a flight of two aircraft on a combat air patrol over Route 7, the North Vietnamese Army’s logistical lifeline in northern Laos. The two aircraft had departed Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base at 1:15 PM. Enroute to the target area, they were informed that the weather was marginal. When they arrived over the objective, they passed through low overcast to make ground reference in order to recon the road. Because of the marginal weather, the flight leader, Firefly 32, directed his wingman to climb out to the east to inform Cricket, the on-site command and control aircraft, that the area was unworkable. Firefly 33 acknowledged the transmission, then radioed again he was “in the clear over the ‘Bird’s Head,’” a landmark so named by American air crews. Firefly 32 transmitted again for his wingman to join him on top of the clouds, adding that he was going to change frequencies to give Cricket an updated weather report. By the time flight leader returned to the operational frequency, he was unable to reestablish radio contact with Herrick. Flying below the clouds at an altitude of 50 to 100 feet, Firefly 32 searched the narrow valley for his wingman. Finding no trace of his wingman, the flight leader returned to base. Over the next few days, in addition to the formal search and rescue operation, pilots from the 602nd Special Operations Squadron thoroughly searched for signs of Herrick and his aircraft. During a routine flight on October 30, 1969, wreckage and a burned area at the approximate last known position of Herrick’s aircraft was found in the high terrain northeast of the Bird’s Head. Though unable to identify the wreckage as that of a Skyraider, the observer’s extensive knowledge of the area enabled him to positively state that it had not been there 5 days before when he had previously flown over the area. Heavy enemy activity prevented a ground search of the wreckage and the surrounding area. At the time the search was terminated, Herrick was listed Missing in Action. He was promoted to Captain during the time he was missing. [Taken from coffeltdatabase.org and taskforceomegainc.org]
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