ARTHUR F HENDERSON
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HONORED ON PANEL 26W, LINE 11 OF THE WALL

ARTHUR FRANKLIN HENDERSON

WALL NAME

ARTHUR F HENDERSON

PANEL / LINE

26W/11

DATE OF BIRTH

08/13/1948

CASUALTY PROVINCE

QUANG NAM

DATE OF CASUALTY

04/19/1969

HOME OF RECORD

LOS ANGELES

COUNTY OF RECORD

Los Angeles County

STATE

CA

BRANCH OF SERVICE

MARINE CORPS

RANK

LCPL

REMEMBRANCES

LEFT FOR ARTHUR FRANKLIN HENDERSON
POSTED ON 5.9.2019
POSTED BY: Lucy Micik

Thank You

Dear Lcpl Arthur Henderson,
Thank you for your service as an Aircraft Electronics Systems Technician. I did the research on you on your 50th anniversary, sad. The 44th anniversary of the official end of the war just passed.. The war was years ago, but we all need to acknowledge the sacrifices of those like you who answered our nation's call. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in Peace with the angels.
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POSTED ON 9.25.2017
POSTED BY: Joe Gonzalez

Brothers In Arms - Friends Forever

Art, I finally found your name on the wall and placed my letterman's V patch below your name. My family stood still while I told them stories about our friendship in high school, about your loyalty, character and friendship we had. Brother, I hope you found what you were looking for and now found lastening pease.
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POSTED ON 12.17.2013
POSTED BY: Curt Carter [email protected]

Remembering An American Hero

Dear LCPL Arthur Franklin Henderson, sir

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned.

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you.

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir

Curt Carter
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POSTED ON 4.19.2012
POSTED BY: A Marine

Semper Fi

Semper Fi, Marine.
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POSTED ON 4.11.2012

Last Mission of U.S. Marine Corps helicopter CH-46D tail number 154835

There are two accounts. #1: CH-46D tail number 154835 was on Medevac on Charley Ridge W of DaNang. Crew members included CPT Robert D. Huie (KIA), MAJ Bernard R. Terhorst (KIA), HMC Gerald D. Angelley (KIA), CPL Gaylen R. Gallion (KIA), and LCP Arthur F. Henderson (KIA). The aircraft was hit multiple times in broom closet area. Both hydraulic systems shot away. One lost immediately, second gradually lost pressure. AC remained airborne for some time (15-20 minutes?) while crew tried to get to suitable runway. The aircraft became more and more uncontrollable as the #2 hydraulics bled away. Aircraft Commander MAJ Terhorst was going to try to roll it on at Thuong Duc SF camp dirt runway above 40 knots. (The NATOPS recommended procedure in event of no hydraulics landing). An ARMY Caribou was sitting in the middle of the runway there and nobody could raise them on any frequency including guard to get him off the runway. They ran out of hydraulics, luck, and time soon after that, rolled inverted, and went in. [Submitted by John Van Nortwick, HMM-263 Squadron S-3 at the time of incident.] #2: I was flying gunner in the lead bird of a flight of 2 CH-46s flying medevacs. The missions prior to the incident had been quiet ones, so much so that the chase plane's crew was getting bored. They asked to switch to lead on the next mission and did. The next mission was to be a cable extraction through the trees because there was no clearing large enough in which to land. The grunts on the ground said they hadn't received any enemy fire in several hours so no one expected what happened. MAJ Terhorst maneuvered into a hover over a hole in the jungle canopy. The crew chief lowered the cable and the Marines on the ground hooked up the wounded man, LCPL Theodore S. Rolstad (KIA). As the wounded man was being hoisted up, the entire perimeter erupted with muzzle flashes. To make a long story short, they took numerous hits and the pilot tried to fly back to the lowlands and attempt a landing. However, the hydraulics systems had been shot out and it was impossible to control the plane. They suddenly did about 359 degrees of a 360 degree loop and crashed in a giant fireball. All six aboard died instantly. [Submitted by Joe Goins, Gunner on lead ship in formation (HMM-263)] Both accounts taken from vhpa.org
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